group getting their fantasy football draftFor anyone who is an avid sports fan, this is a great time of year. The baseball pennant races are full-bore, the college football season has kicked off and the 94th season of the National Football League (NFL) begins on Thursday night, September 5, 2013. Six months later, on February 2, 2014, the NFL season will end with the crowning of a champion team of Super Bowl XLVIII.

Between now and February, a curious addiction will befall many otherwise sane men and women who enjoy following professional football. They will be consumed with the stats of players who most likely don’t even play for their favorite teams. They will spend many hours studying obscure facts such as how well a given running back performs on artificial turf versus real grass. They will struggle to juggle all-star lineups to best take advantage of a scoring system that approaches the complexity of the U.S. Tax Code.

Unlike the treatment delivered by the specialists at Texas Back Institute to patients with back pain, herniated discs or other back problems, there is really no cure for this football sickness. These lost souls are smitten by the phenomenon of playing fantasy football!

Consuming Football Facts

It may not surprise you to learn fantasy football is a very big business. It is estimated by the Fantasy Sports Trade Association that 32 million people, aged twelve and older in the U.S. and Canada, play fantasy sports. The trade group notes that fantasy football players make up 90% of the fantasy sports “industry.” This participation has grown by over 60% the last four years with 19% of males in the U.S. playing fantasy sports.

Because of this high level of participation many consumer products companies such as Sprint, Yahoo, ESPN, Fox and others have invested millions of dollars in fantasy football services and promotions. The two groups who usually disagree about almost everything associated with professional football – NFL properties (composed of the team owners) and NFL Players (the players’ union) – have both created products and services that encourage fans to play fantasy football.

The Texas Back Institute Dream Team 

Most of the fun of playing fantasy football involves choosing a “dream team” from a group of outstanding players. There are no bad football players in the NFL. They’re all good. Therefore, getting to choose the best of the best for one’s own team can be great fun.

In a similar fashion, the spine specialists at Texas Back Institute are the best in their class and as such, there are only great choices. In celebration of the hundreds of thousands of fantasy drafts in full-swing at this moment, we thought we’d introduce you to our dream team.

History of the Team:

Texas Back Institute was formed in 1977 by Stephen Hochschuler, M.D., Ralph Rashbaum, M.D. and Richard Guyer, M.D. The organization is internationally recognized for excellence for spine injuries. In football terms, this team plays offense and defense equally well and the patients are the big winners.

The Texas Back Institute Fantasy Team:

As with NFL teams, the Texas Back Institute team is composed of the best of the best of spine surgery, research and therapy. The game plan for our team has been consistent for more than 35 years. Each patient injury or condition is unique and is best treated with the most minimally invasive approach.

Here’s a brief “draft” report on each of the Texas Back Institute physicians.

arakal0Rajesh G. Arakal, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Arakal and other TBI surgeons to your team if you need thorough evaluation and treatment of cervical, thoracic and lumbar pathology.

Belanger_MD_small

Theodore Belanger, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Belanger and other TBI back experts to your team if you want a spine specialist who evaluates each patient and their situation carefully and makes treatment recommendations based on their goals.

Block_PhD_Small

Andrew R. Block, Ph.D., A.B.P.P.

Specialties: Psychologist

Add Dr. Block to your team if you need to overcome emotional difficulties of surgery, deal with stress and control medications to achieve the best surgical outcomes.

blumenthal

Scott L. Blumenthal, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Blumenthal and other TBI back specialists to your team if you believe the goal of a spine surgeon is to get his patients back to life using the most advanced motion-preserving technologies, including lumbar and cervical artificial discs as well as posterior dynamic stabilization.

bosita

Rey Bosita, M.D., M.B.A.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Bosita and other TBI physicians to your team if you want to be treated with respect and have your fears about neck and back pain removed.

bradley

W. Daniel Bradley, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Dr. Bradley along with every other TBI specialist should be on your team if you feel treatment should use the latest in motion preservation and minimally invasive surgical techniques.

cable

James D. Cable, M.D.

Specialties: Occupational & Sports Medicine

Add Dr. Cable to your team for occupational and sports medicine issues. He knows wear and tear eventually affect all of us but most back pain is manageable with proper care.

duff_small

Michael F. Duffy, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Duffy to your team if you agree that we should get busy living! His goal and that of the other spine specialists at TBI is to deliver effective spinal care to patients in order for them to return to doing what it is that makes them happy.

gibbs

Sharon J. Gibbs, M.D.

Specialties: Physiatrist

Add Dr. Gibbs to your team if being in pain affects many aspects of your life. As a physiatrist she works hard to provide patients with the best comprehensive non-surgical care.

guyer

Richard D. Guyer, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

As one of the founding physicians of Texas Back Institute, Dr. Guyer is both a player and a coach for new team members. Add him to your team if you agree with his “family test” philosophy – treating patients the way he would want his family members to be treated.

Henry_MD_web_1

Shawn M. Henry, D.O.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Dr. Henry and the other spine specialists at TBI should be on your team if you want to be treated with the most advanced technology and treatment available for your condition; holding surgery as a last resort.

hisey

Michael S. Hisey, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Hisey to your team if you feel the goal of neck and back treatment is to return patients to productive and pain-free activity using the most advanced minimally invasive and motion-preserving techniques.

hochschuler

Stephen H. Hochschuler, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Hochschuler and the other spine surgeons at Texas Back Institute to your team if you have lumbar spinal problems or have had a failed spinal procedure.

Jehan_85x85_1

Effat Jehan, M.D.

Specialties: Spine Triage Specialist

Add Dr. Jehan and the other specialists at TBI to your team if you feel the goal should be to help treat not only back and neck issues but also to provide effective coordinated support to help patients get through every day of life without any stresses related to their condition.

lankford

Craig Lankford, M.D.

Specialties: Physiatrist

If you want to be treated with respect, compassion, add Dr. Lankford and every other physician at TBI to your team. He can help you understand how pain affects your everyday life in order to help you get back to life.

lieberman

Isador Lieberman, M.D., M.B.A., FRCSC

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Lieberman and the other spine surgery experts at TBI to you team if you want to be treated as if you were the only patient we have.

marchetti

Jason Marchetti, M.D.

Specialties: Physiatrist

If you believe in ethical treatment and the importance of educating patients regarding all available treatment options, you should consider adding Dr. Marchetti and the other spine specialists at TBI to your team.

patel

Nayan R. Patel, M.D.

Specialties: Physiatrists

Add Dr. Patel to you team if you think patients should be treated in the same way a physician treats his own family.

rashbaum

Ralph F. Rashbaum, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon, Pain Management

Add Dr. Rashbaum and the other spine surgery specialists at TBI to your team if you want a timely response to back conditions which leads to predictable outcomes.

shellock

Jessica Shellock, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Shellock to you team if you think it’s time to take your life back, with minimally invasive treatment. Along with the other experts on the TBI team, she is highly trained in the latest procedures.

Tolhurst_MD_web

Stephen R. Tolhurst, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

If you want a doctor who sees surgery as a last resort and is dedicated to returning you to the lifestyle you had before the back pain, you want Dr. Tolhurst on your team.

zigler

Jack E. Zigler, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeons

Add Dr. Zigler and the other spine surgeons at TBI to your team if think surgery should be the last resort. However, if it’s required, he’s one of the best spine surgeons in the U.S.

Choosing Your Team

There are literally hundreds of ways to set up your league and arrange for a draft of NFL players. The best advice for those new to this pastime is to understand how the players’ performance will be scored each week. This will help determine the number of running backs, wide receivers, tight ends to choose. For example, in some leagues, the yardage gained by running backs is weighted higher than the passing yardage of quarterbacks.

One should also be aware of the “bye” weeks each team has (when they are not playing) because this will mean a player on the team with the bye, will not play that week and should not be in the lineup.  Here’s a good primer  on choosing your fantasy team.

Fortunately, choosing a spine specialist is much easier than choosing a fantasy football team! With more than 35 years of excellence in spine treatments, management of many FDA trials and a foundation of minimally invasive treatment, the dream team of physicians at Texas Back Institute is championship caliber.

Update from Ethiopia

March 27, 2013

Surgery on that cutey was Sunday. She is doing great. It took a few days to coax another smile, but all is well. I have a lot of great cases to show when I get back.

Ted Belanger

Day 6: March 23rd, 2013

Here is a 13 year old cutie that will be having surgery this week.  She has a 60 degree thoracic scoliosis. For anyone not familiar, that means she is at very high risk for progression and will likely develop an 80, 90 or 100 degree curve over the next 2 to 3 years if left untreated.  Her surgery will be relatively straight forward now, and much more difficult (with possibly the need for more levels of fusion) and higher risk if done in the future.

DrBelangerSpineSurgeryMission

Her name is Mareg, which is a common name here.  Wish her (and me) luck.

Ted Belanger

Dr. Ted Belanger, one of Texas Back Institute’s orthopedic spine surgeons, is currently in Ethiopia where his is treating patients suffering from spinal conditions. Dr. Belanger will be sharing stories with us throughout his trip.

Below is his first blog entry!

tbi-belanger

Day 1: 3/18/2013

Arrived safe and sound this morning in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Ethiopia_map

Unfortunately, I am struggling with a cold that made my first day here pretty unproductive. I am hoping this will pass quickly. I am touching base with all of our various contacts here and getting some wild cases set up. My first one might be an os odontoideum with spinal cord compression and myelopathy. Yikes.

DAY 2: 3/19/2013

I am feeling a bit better. I accomplished a great deal yesterday. I saw 11 patients with various spine deformities in the clinic and we are finalizing workups to set them up for surgery. We may transfer a patient from another hospital that needs a C1-2 fusion (or so it has been suggested). I saw some old friends and met some new ones. I went to the customs authority to work on getting our supplies released, and I had to go through three large bins of equipment and identify each item and correlate it with the itemized list (think of….this is a tap, this is a screwdriver, this is a compressor, etc.) Luckily, I didn’t have to go to the length of identifying each individual screw by diameter and length. I did my best to stay positive and hide any impatience or American ego as best I could. Despite that major obstacle being overcome, our supplies have still not been released. I am hopeful they will be later today.

Day 4: 3/21/13

Did a big case yesterday.  Pedicle subtraction osteotomy for a chronic fracture that collapsed into kyphosis after being fixed with a short construct by one of the local surgeons.  Made it look pretty.  Have two scoliosis cases to do today, and every day until I come home…

– Ted

Mistakes Men Make Concerning their Back Health

Men taking charge is nothing new in most situations.  At work, at the gym, on the sports field or even when a little spider invades the kitchen.  When it comes to their back health and safety men can be known for being a little lackadaisical.

Dr. Ted Belanger, an orthopedic spine surgeon at Texas Back Institute in Rockwall shares 5 mistakes men can make when it comes to their spine health.

 

1)       They don’t exercise their back.  Guys go to the gym and exercise their “glamour muscles” to get strong and look trim, but they only rarely do any exercises to strengthen their back.  Your back is made of the same tissues as your arms and legs, and responds to exercise in much the same way.  The old adage that it’s dangerous to exercise or use your back for strenuous activity is a myth.  You can strengthen it just the same as you strengthen your biceps—with repetitive range of motion against resistance until you reach muscle fatigue.

2)       They don’t do enough research.  Very often evaluation of back problems is sought without any careful research to determine who might be the best person to see.  There are big differences in the training, background, certification and experience of the various practitioners available to assess a patient with a complaint about their back or spine.  The list includes chiropractors, primary care physicians, physiatrists, pain management doctors, orthopaedic surgeons, neurosurgeons and orthopaedic spine surgeons.  Among these, no specialist has more training and experience assessing and treating musculoskeletal conditions than an orthopaedic surgeon.  Most of the others on the list either have very little musculoskeletal training (neurosurgeon) or have no experience at all in the surgical treatment of spine conditions (all the rest).  An orthopaedic spine surgeon is in the best position to diagnose and treat a patient with a back/spine problem, whether or not they need surgery.

3)       They don’t ask enough questions.  Patients often present for a second opinion to our clinic.  A common element of their frustration and sometimes confusion is a lack of understanding of their problem.  This can be avoided by insisting your questions be answered the first time around.  Bringing a list of standard questions is a great way to make sure you are communicating well with your doctor.  Good questions are:  What is my diagnosis?  What will happen if I don’t do anything about it?  What are my options to treat it and what can I expect from the treatment?  How does the treatment work, exactly?

4)       They don’t recognize the difference between amateur and expert advice.  People often put as much weight on their neighbor or friend’s back advice as they do their doctor. While good-intentioned, the patient should at least recognize that their doctor, particularly if they are an orthopaedic spine surgeon or neurosurgeon, has much more insight and understanding about the diagnosis and treatment options.  A common comment made by patients and their friends and family is “back surgery doesn’t work”.  But that’s a drastic generalization that simply isn’t true.  There are many different kinds of back surgery (discectomy, fusion, disc replacement, decompression, etc.) and many different reasons to undergo back surgery (degenerative conditions, fractures, trauma, scoliosis, deformity, tumor, infection).  Whether or not surgery is successful depends largely on the diagnosis you are treating, the details of the workup, the execution of the surgery, the choice of surgical technique, and the alignment of the expectations of the patient with what the surgery can accomplish.  Orthopaedic Spine Surgeons know this better than anyone else.

5)       They too often think their back problem is hopeless and they just need to “live with it”.  Patients are often afraid to seek advice about surgery because they are afraid.  They should think of the office visit the way the doctor does: a consultation to answer questions and provide information.  The decision about what treatment to participate in always rests with the patient.  If you are still not sure after visiting with a doctor, feel free to do more research, ask more questions, and seek more advice from experts.  Sometimes second or even third opinions are necessary to come to a decision about how to proceed.

If you or someone you know has fallen victim to one of these mistakes, it’s not too late.  Give us a call today and we will talk to you about your situation and help you figure out what the best treatments are for you!

We have talked about Dr. Belanger before, but for those who haven’t heard about him, he is the latest addition to the Texas Back Institute physician team. He joined our team in January and works out of our Rockwall office.  He is an orthopedic spine surgeon and he is in Rockwall full-time! We are so excited to have him as part of our TBI family! 

Since it has been a full 6 months since Dr. Belanger came onboard we decided we wanted to thank some of the physician’s in the area that have helped welcome Dr. Belanger into the Rockwall medical community.  What better way to do this than a sunset sail on Lake Ray Hubbard? 

Our view walking from the shops to the pier.  Gorgeous!

Cheryl and Dr. Bean on the boat.

Dr. Belanger and his wife Toni.

The grub!

The whole gang!

We had such a good time and were so happy that everyone was able to make it out!  Thanks for everyone who came! 

As a final thought, check out how cute this little duck family was! Adorable!

Super Doctors!!!!

March 23, 2011

Living magazine recently did a feature in their March issue showcasing “Super Docs” throughout the community.  Well guess who made it on the list….Texas Back Institute. Congratulations on being “SUPER“!

Our Plano physicians

 

Dr. Henry and Dr. Duffy

Dr. Gibbs, Dr. Lankford and Dr. Guyer at our Trophy Club office

 

 

Dr. Belanger, our newest physician at our Rockwall office

 

Our Flower Mound and Denton physicians, Dr. Arakal, Dr. Bradley, Dr. Marchetti and Dr. Bosita

We know finding a spine specialist can be a complex process and our goal is to make it as easy as possible.  With 20 physicians and 14 convenient locations throughout the metroplex – let us help you get back to life!

 

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