group getting their fantasy football draftFor anyone who is an avid sports fan, this is a great time of year. The baseball pennant races are full-bore, the college football season has kicked off and the 94th season of the National Football League (NFL) begins on Thursday night, September 5, 2013. Six months later, on February 2, 2014, the NFL season will end with the crowning of a champion team of Super Bowl XLVIII.

Between now and February, a curious addiction will befall many otherwise sane men and women who enjoy following professional football. They will be consumed with the stats of players who most likely don’t even play for their favorite teams. They will spend many hours studying obscure facts such as how well a given running back performs on artificial turf versus real grass. They will struggle to juggle all-star lineups to best take advantage of a scoring system that approaches the complexity of the U.S. Tax Code.

Unlike the treatment delivered by the specialists at Texas Back Institute to patients with back pain, herniated discs or other back problems, there is really no cure for this football sickness. These lost souls are smitten by the phenomenon of playing fantasy football!

Consuming Football Facts

It may not surprise you to learn fantasy football is a very big business. It is estimated by the Fantasy Sports Trade Association that 32 million people, aged twelve and older in the U.S. and Canada, play fantasy sports. The trade group notes that fantasy football players make up 90% of the fantasy sports “industry.” This participation has grown by over 60% the last four years with 19% of males in the U.S. playing fantasy sports.

Because of this high level of participation many consumer products companies such as Sprint, Yahoo, ESPN, Fox and others have invested millions of dollars in fantasy football services and promotions. The two groups who usually disagree about almost everything associated with professional football – NFL properties (composed of the team owners) and NFL Players (the players’ union) – have both created products and services that encourage fans to play fantasy football.

The Texas Back Institute Dream Team 

Most of the fun of playing fantasy football involves choosing a “dream team” from a group of outstanding players. There are no bad football players in the NFL. They’re all good. Therefore, getting to choose the best of the best for one’s own team can be great fun.

In a similar fashion, the spine specialists at Texas Back Institute are the best in their class and as such, there are only great choices. In celebration of the hundreds of thousands of fantasy drafts in full-swing at this moment, we thought we’d introduce you to our dream team.

History of the Team:

Texas Back Institute was formed in 1977 by Stephen Hochschuler, M.D., Ralph Rashbaum, M.D. and Richard Guyer, M.D. The organization is internationally recognized for excellence for spine injuries. In football terms, this team plays offense and defense equally well and the patients are the big winners.

The Texas Back Institute Fantasy Team:

As with NFL teams, the Texas Back Institute team is composed of the best of the best of spine surgery, research and therapy. The game plan for our team has been consistent for more than 35 years. Each patient injury or condition is unique and is best treated with the most minimally invasive approach.

Here’s a brief “draft” report on each of the Texas Back Institute physicians.

arakal0Rajesh G. Arakal, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Arakal and other TBI surgeons to your team if you need thorough evaluation and treatment of cervical, thoracic and lumbar pathology.

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Theodore Belanger, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Belanger and other TBI back experts to your team if you want a spine specialist who evaluates each patient and their situation carefully and makes treatment recommendations based on their goals.

Block_PhD_Small

Andrew R. Block, Ph.D., A.B.P.P.

Specialties: Psychologist

Add Dr. Block to your team if you need to overcome emotional difficulties of surgery, deal with stress and control medications to achieve the best surgical outcomes.

blumenthal

Scott L. Blumenthal, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Blumenthal and other TBI back specialists to your team if you believe the goal of a spine surgeon is to get his patients back to life using the most advanced motion-preserving technologies, including lumbar and cervical artificial discs as well as posterior dynamic stabilization.

bosita

Rey Bosita, M.D., M.B.A.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Bosita and other TBI physicians to your team if you want to be treated with respect and have your fears about neck and back pain removed.

bradley

W. Daniel Bradley, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Dr. Bradley along with every other TBI specialist should be on your team if you feel treatment should use the latest in motion preservation and minimally invasive surgical techniques.

cable

James D. Cable, M.D.

Specialties: Occupational & Sports Medicine

Add Dr. Cable to your team for occupational and sports medicine issues. He knows wear and tear eventually affect all of us but most back pain is manageable with proper care.

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Michael F. Duffy, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Duffy to your team if you agree that we should get busy living! His goal and that of the other spine specialists at TBI is to deliver effective spinal care to patients in order for them to return to doing what it is that makes them happy.

gibbs

Sharon J. Gibbs, M.D.

Specialties: Physiatrist

Add Dr. Gibbs to your team if being in pain affects many aspects of your life. As a physiatrist she works hard to provide patients with the best comprehensive non-surgical care.

guyer

Richard D. Guyer, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

As one of the founding physicians of Texas Back Institute, Dr. Guyer is both a player and a coach for new team members. Add him to your team if you agree with his “family test” philosophy – treating patients the way he would want his family members to be treated.

Henry_MD_web_1

Shawn M. Henry, D.O.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Dr. Henry and the other spine specialists at TBI should be on your team if you want to be treated with the most advanced technology and treatment available for your condition; holding surgery as a last resort.

hisey

Michael S. Hisey, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Hisey to your team if you feel the goal of neck and back treatment is to return patients to productive and pain-free activity using the most advanced minimally invasive and motion-preserving techniques.

hochschuler

Stephen H. Hochschuler, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Hochschuler and the other spine surgeons at Texas Back Institute to your team if you have lumbar spinal problems or have had a failed spinal procedure.

Jehan_85x85_1

Effat Jehan, M.D.

Specialties: Spine Triage Specialist

Add Dr. Jehan and the other specialists at TBI to your team if you feel the goal should be to help treat not only back and neck issues but also to provide effective coordinated support to help patients get through every day of life without any stresses related to their condition.

lankford

Craig Lankford, M.D.

Specialties: Physiatrist

If you want to be treated with respect, compassion, add Dr. Lankford and every other physician at TBI to your team. He can help you understand how pain affects your everyday life in order to help you get back to life.

lieberman

Isador Lieberman, M.D., M.B.A., FRCSC

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Lieberman and the other spine surgery experts at TBI to you team if you want to be treated as if you were the only patient we have.

marchetti

Jason Marchetti, M.D.

Specialties: Physiatrist

If you believe in ethical treatment and the importance of educating patients regarding all available treatment options, you should consider adding Dr. Marchetti and the other spine specialists at TBI to your team.

patel

Nayan R. Patel, M.D.

Specialties: Physiatrists

Add Dr. Patel to you team if you think patients should be treated in the same way a physician treats his own family.

rashbaum

Ralph F. Rashbaum, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon, Pain Management

Add Dr. Rashbaum and the other spine surgery specialists at TBI to your team if you want a timely response to back conditions which leads to predictable outcomes.

shellock

Jessica Shellock, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Shellock to you team if you think it’s time to take your life back, with minimally invasive treatment. Along with the other experts on the TBI team, she is highly trained in the latest procedures.

Tolhurst_MD_web

Stephen R. Tolhurst, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

If you want a doctor who sees surgery as a last resort and is dedicated to returning you to the lifestyle you had before the back pain, you want Dr. Tolhurst on your team.

zigler

Jack E. Zigler, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeons

Add Dr. Zigler and the other spine surgeons at TBI to your team if think surgery should be the last resort. However, if it’s required, he’s one of the best spine surgeons in the U.S.

Choosing Your Team

There are literally hundreds of ways to set up your league and arrange for a draft of NFL players. The best advice for those new to this pastime is to understand how the players’ performance will be scored each week. This will help determine the number of running backs, wide receivers, tight ends to choose. For example, in some leagues, the yardage gained by running backs is weighted higher than the passing yardage of quarterbacks.

One should also be aware of the “bye” weeks each team has (when they are not playing) because this will mean a player on the team with the bye, will not play that week and should not be in the lineup.  Here’s a good primer  on choosing your fantasy team.

Fortunately, choosing a spine specialist is much easier than choosing a fantasy football team! With more than 35 years of excellence in spine treatments, management of many FDA trials and a foundation of minimally invasive treatment, the dream team of physicians at Texas Back Institute is championship caliber.

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What is it about the spring and summer that makes us believe our bodies are indestructible? Maybe it’s the warm weather beckoning us to get out of the house after a long, cold winter. Perhaps it’s the traditional warm-weather outdoor activities such as gardening, walking, biking, running or fishing. It could be the horror that comes from glancing at the full-length mirror in the hall and noticing  the winter weight – resulting from all the comfort food and no physical activity – is about to be displayed for the entire world to see the first time a swimsuit or tennis togs are worn.

For these and a myriad of other reasons, many otherwise sane individuals decide  the pleasant chirping of birds and distant hum of a lawn mower should be accompanied by the sounds of running shoes hitting the pavement and the huffing and puffing that comes from someone trying get back into shape. In moderation, this is a worthwhile and even healthy endeavor. However, if it’s overdone or done improperly, it can result in debilitating back pain, excruciating joint pain, herniated discs, sacroiliac joint strains and possible injury to the spine, neck and limbs.

In order to help you avoid this rite of spring, we’ve asked Texas Back Institute occupational and sports medicine specialist, Dr. James Cable, to give us some insights on avoiding the pain while realizing the gain of exercise and activity. Before getting this advice, it’s interesting to review the ways we abuse our bodies, in the hopes of getting into swimsuit shape.

The Numbers Don’t Lie

The Center for Disease Control (CDC) is the U.S. governmental agency charged with a wide range of public health monitoring and management duties and one of its missions involves promoting physical activities and preventing injuries. The agency’s website notes, “Participation in sports, recreation, and exercise is increasingly popular and widespread in American culture. These activities include organized sports (school or club) and unorganized sports (backyard or pick-up), such as basketball, football, and hockey; recreational activities, such as boating, biking, skiing, swimming, and playground activities; and exercise and training activities, such as weight-lifting, aerobics, and jogging.”

The site continues, “Participation in sports, recreation and exercise activities contributes to health-related fitness; however, the risk of injury is inherent in any physical activity.” This is why the CDC is concerned about you or your family members’ participation in organized or individual exercise and recreational activities.

The public health agency references some serious public health data.

  • More than 10,000 people receive treatment in the nation’s emergency departments each day for injuries sustained in (recreational) activities.
  • At least one of every five emergency room visits for an injury results from participation in sports or recreation.
  • 1999, Americans made an estimated 1.5 million ER visits for injuries sustained while playing basketball, baseball, softball, football, or soccer.
  • Approximately 715,000 sports and recreation injuries occur each year in school settings alone.

And here is the most depressing part of these data.

  • Injuries are also a leading reason people stop participating in potentially beneficial physical activity.

The statistical breakdown on sports and recreational injuries is also interesting to contemplate – especially before jumping in to that full-court basketball game without warming up.

  • Children younger than 15 years account for about 40% of all recreation related emergency room visits.
  • Adolescents and young adults under age 25 have high participation rates in recreational activities and experience almost one third of all recreational-related injuries.
  • The population of older adults is increasing, and little is known about their injury risk during participation in Sports Related Exercise.  In 1996, emergency rooms treated more than 53,000 sports and recreation-related injuries among people 65 and older, a 54% increase from 1990.

This third point suggests even more mayhem as the Baby Boomer generation, which has a well-chronicled interest in feeling and looking healthy, ages. This zest for life and activity combined with the wear and tear on muscles and joints exponentially increases the potential for emergency room visits.

With All of These Fitness Options, Why is Obesity at an All-Time High?

With the popularity of “boot camps” and “cross fit” training along with the proliferation of high-tech workout facilities, spinning classes, treadmills and other fitness equipment, soccer camps, basketball camps, marathon training classes and any number of other sports and recreational opportunities men, women and children have numerous opportunities to get fit. With all of these opportunities, the intriguing question is: Why is the U.S. population – especially children – more obese than it has ever been in history?

The answer may have to do with the fact  pain and injuries discourage adults of all ages and kids from participating in regular fitness activities. This would also explain why the public health experts at the CDC are concerned about sports and recreational injury trends.

Before Undertaking Vigorous Activity – Read This

 Aside from the healthcare expenses, the human misery associated with spring and summer recreational activities are serious considerations.Therefore, before taking off on that 50-mile bike ride with no advance training, or having too much weight on the bench press bar, take a minute to read this advice from Dr. James Cable. He is a specialist in recreational and occupational back injuries at Texas Back Institute.

Dr Cable W Patient

What are the most prevalent sports and recreation related injuries  you treat in the spring and summer?

As people get more active – working out or doing yard work – the most common injury is a back sprain. Usually, if someone with a back sprain can take it easy and then slowly get back into gentle activity, they are able to overcome this problem. However, if they’ve given it 2 to 4 weeks to rest and they are still experiencing pain, they should probably get some medical attention. For a normal back sprain, one shouldn’t spend more than a couple of days in bed because any more than this will cause a loss in muscle strength. Conversely, they don’t want to exacerbate the injury. The best approach is to slowly test the water by slowly increasing the activity.

What can a person who has been inactive during the winter do to acclimate themselves to outdoor activities, without becoming injured?

They should use basic athletic training principles of gradual increases in the level of activity. For example, if someone is not accustomed to running, she/he should undertake a walking/jogging approach. This involves alternating three minutes of walking and one minute of jogging for a total of 30 minutes. Gradually, the individual should work to increase the number of minutes jogging, while still alternating with walking for a total of one hour. The key is to slowly ease into the activity. If it’s yard work your undertaking, you don’t want to be lifting 100 pound bags of cement unless you’re used to lifting this weight.

What are the types back injuries  you treat most often for those participating in spring sports and recreation?

The types of back injuries  we see the most of are those that occur from lifting, twisting and bending. These are back muscle strains, herniated discs and sacroiliac joint strains. The pressure from lifting that 100-pound of cement or twisting the body in the course of a pickup basketball game loads the spine in an awkward fashion. Under extreme conditions lifting heavy objects can result in the discs being ruptured.

Common aches and pains will always occur when someone takes part in strenuous activity. However, is there a type of pain or feeling that suggests  medical attention should be sought immediately?

It is very rare but if the person becomes paralyzed or loses control of their bowel and/or bladder, they should go to the Emergency Room immediately. Short of that, if one develops gradual numbness in legs or arms, they need to come in to see us. Neurologic symptoms such as dragging a foot or the extreme symptoms noted above are alarming and very rare, but if they occur after strenuous physical activity, a doctor’s exam is called for.

What is your best advice for someone thinking about getting into shape this spring?

Don’t get out of shape in the first place! The biggest battle involves the couch potato who has not been in shape for years. However, we live in the real world and lots of people are out of shape. Even athletes who fail to maintain a level of physical activity can get out of shape. However, if they have been in good condition before, it’s easier for them to get back into shape. The best advice is to do something; walking, ride a stationary bike just get moving a little. Fortunately, people who are not used to exercising will see benefits a lot faster, because their baseline is lower.

Since Sunday is Mother’s Day, here’s a story about my mom. We had some puppies and I gave my mom one of these little guys. She’s about 5’ 1” and at the time was a little overweight and had health issues associated with this weight problem. This is a lady who got no exercise whatsoever. Well, the puppy wanted to be walked and she started walking him around the block a couple of times each day. The effect of this minimal exercise was pretty amazing. She lost 20 pounds and her blood pressure normalized just by taking her dog out for a walk. If she can get into shape with this small commitment of time, anyone can!


 

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