group getting their fantasy football draftFor anyone who is an avid sports fan, this is a great time of year. The baseball pennant races are full-bore, the college football season has kicked off and the 94th season of the National Football League (NFL) begins on Thursday night, September 5, 2013. Six months later, on February 2, 2014, the NFL season will end with the crowning of a champion team of Super Bowl XLVIII.

Between now and February, a curious addiction will befall many otherwise sane men and women who enjoy following professional football. They will be consumed with the stats of players who most likely don’t even play for their favorite teams. They will spend many hours studying obscure facts such as how well a given running back performs on artificial turf versus real grass. They will struggle to juggle all-star lineups to best take advantage of a scoring system that approaches the complexity of the U.S. Tax Code.

Unlike the treatment delivered by the specialists at Texas Back Institute to patients with back pain, herniated discs or other back problems, there is really no cure for this football sickness. These lost souls are smitten by the phenomenon of playing fantasy football!

Consuming Football Facts

It may not surprise you to learn fantasy football is a very big business. It is estimated by the Fantasy Sports Trade Association that 32 million people, aged twelve and older in the U.S. and Canada, play fantasy sports. The trade group notes that fantasy football players make up 90% of the fantasy sports “industry.” This participation has grown by over 60% the last four years with 19% of males in the U.S. playing fantasy sports.

Because of this high level of participation many consumer products companies such as Sprint, Yahoo, ESPN, Fox and others have invested millions of dollars in fantasy football services and promotions. The two groups who usually disagree about almost everything associated with professional football – NFL properties (composed of the team owners) and NFL Players (the players’ union) – have both created products and services that encourage fans to play fantasy football.

The Texas Back Institute Dream Team 

Most of the fun of playing fantasy football involves choosing a “dream team” from a group of outstanding players. There are no bad football players in the NFL. They’re all good. Therefore, getting to choose the best of the best for one’s own team can be great fun.

In a similar fashion, the spine specialists at Texas Back Institute are the best in their class and as such, there are only great choices. In celebration of the hundreds of thousands of fantasy drafts in full-swing at this moment, we thought we’d introduce you to our dream team.

History of the Team:

Texas Back Institute was formed in 1977 by Stephen Hochschuler, M.D., Ralph Rashbaum, M.D. and Richard Guyer, M.D. The organization is internationally recognized for excellence for spine injuries. In football terms, this team plays offense and defense equally well and the patients are the big winners.

The Texas Back Institute Fantasy Team:

As with NFL teams, the Texas Back Institute team is composed of the best of the best of spine surgery, research and therapy. The game plan for our team has been consistent for more than 35 years. Each patient injury or condition is unique and is best treated with the most minimally invasive approach.

Here’s a brief “draft” report on each of the Texas Back Institute physicians.

arakal0Rajesh G. Arakal, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Arakal and other TBI surgeons to your team if you need thorough evaluation and treatment of cervical, thoracic and lumbar pathology.

Belanger_MD_small

Theodore Belanger, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Belanger and other TBI back experts to your team if you want a spine specialist who evaluates each patient and their situation carefully and makes treatment recommendations based on their goals.

Block_PhD_Small

Andrew R. Block, Ph.D., A.B.P.P.

Specialties: Psychologist

Add Dr. Block to your team if you need to overcome emotional difficulties of surgery, deal with stress and control medications to achieve the best surgical outcomes.

blumenthal

Scott L. Blumenthal, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Blumenthal and other TBI back specialists to your team if you believe the goal of a spine surgeon is to get his patients back to life using the most advanced motion-preserving technologies, including lumbar and cervical artificial discs as well as posterior dynamic stabilization.

bosita

Rey Bosita, M.D., M.B.A.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Bosita and other TBI physicians to your team if you want to be treated with respect and have your fears about neck and back pain removed.

bradley

W. Daniel Bradley, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Dr. Bradley along with every other TBI specialist should be on your team if you feel treatment should use the latest in motion preservation and minimally invasive surgical techniques.

cable

James D. Cable, M.D.

Specialties: Occupational & Sports Medicine

Add Dr. Cable to your team for occupational and sports medicine issues. He knows wear and tear eventually affect all of us but most back pain is manageable with proper care.

duff_small

Michael F. Duffy, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Duffy to your team if you agree that we should get busy living! His goal and that of the other spine specialists at TBI is to deliver effective spinal care to patients in order for them to return to doing what it is that makes them happy.

gibbs

Sharon J. Gibbs, M.D.

Specialties: Physiatrist

Add Dr. Gibbs to your team if being in pain affects many aspects of your life. As a physiatrist she works hard to provide patients with the best comprehensive non-surgical care.

guyer

Richard D. Guyer, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

As one of the founding physicians of Texas Back Institute, Dr. Guyer is both a player and a coach for new team members. Add him to your team if you agree with his “family test” philosophy – treating patients the way he would want his family members to be treated.

Henry_MD_web_1

Shawn M. Henry, D.O.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Dr. Henry and the other spine specialists at TBI should be on your team if you want to be treated with the most advanced technology and treatment available for your condition; holding surgery as a last resort.

hisey

Michael S. Hisey, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Hisey to your team if you feel the goal of neck and back treatment is to return patients to productive and pain-free activity using the most advanced minimally invasive and motion-preserving techniques.

hochschuler

Stephen H. Hochschuler, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Hochschuler and the other spine surgeons at Texas Back Institute to your team if you have lumbar spinal problems or have had a failed spinal procedure.

Jehan_85x85_1

Effat Jehan, M.D.

Specialties: Spine Triage Specialist

Add Dr. Jehan and the other specialists at TBI to your team if you feel the goal should be to help treat not only back and neck issues but also to provide effective coordinated support to help patients get through every day of life without any stresses related to their condition.

lankford

Craig Lankford, M.D.

Specialties: Physiatrist

If you want to be treated with respect, compassion, add Dr. Lankford and every other physician at TBI to your team. He can help you understand how pain affects your everyday life in order to help you get back to life.

lieberman

Isador Lieberman, M.D., M.B.A., FRCSC

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Lieberman and the other spine surgery experts at TBI to you team if you want to be treated as if you were the only patient we have.

marchetti

Jason Marchetti, M.D.

Specialties: Physiatrist

If you believe in ethical treatment and the importance of educating patients regarding all available treatment options, you should consider adding Dr. Marchetti and the other spine specialists at TBI to your team.

patel

Nayan R. Patel, M.D.

Specialties: Physiatrists

Add Dr. Patel to you team if you think patients should be treated in the same way a physician treats his own family.

rashbaum

Ralph F. Rashbaum, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon, Pain Management

Add Dr. Rashbaum and the other spine surgery specialists at TBI to your team if you want a timely response to back conditions which leads to predictable outcomes.

shellock

Jessica Shellock, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Shellock to you team if you think it’s time to take your life back, with minimally invasive treatment. Along with the other experts on the TBI team, she is highly trained in the latest procedures.

Tolhurst_MD_web

Stephen R. Tolhurst, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

If you want a doctor who sees surgery as a last resort and is dedicated to returning you to the lifestyle you had before the back pain, you want Dr. Tolhurst on your team.

zigler

Jack E. Zigler, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeons

Add Dr. Zigler and the other spine surgeons at TBI to your team if think surgery should be the last resort. However, if it’s required, he’s one of the best spine surgeons in the U.S.

Choosing Your Team

There are literally hundreds of ways to set up your league and arrange for a draft of NFL players. The best advice for those new to this pastime is to understand how the players’ performance will be scored each week. This will help determine the number of running backs, wide receivers, tight ends to choose. For example, in some leagues, the yardage gained by running backs is weighted higher than the passing yardage of quarterbacks.

One should also be aware of the “bye” weeks each team has (when they are not playing) because this will mean a player on the team with the bye, will not play that week and should not be in the lineup.  Here’s a good primer  on choosing your fantasy team.

Fortunately, choosing a spine specialist is much easier than choosing a fantasy football team! With more than 35 years of excellence in spine treatments, management of many FDA trials and a foundation of minimally invasive treatment, the dream team of physicians at Texas Back Institute is championship caliber.

Balance and Back Pain

June 28, 2013

nik-wallenda-s-successful-tightrope-walk-over-grand-canyon-covered-by-discovery-channel

After Sunday’s spectacular walk on a 2-inch steel cable across the Grand Canyon, aerialist Nik Wallenda earned a new title: daredevil. His exploits also suggest how important one’s balance is to daily activities – not just survival on the high-wire.  The physicians at Texas Back Institute have first-hand experience helping regular people correct the back pain which can cause a loss of balance, leading to potential injuries from a fall. More on that later, but first let’s briefly review one of the most dramatic walks in history!

Representing the next generation of the famous “Flying Wallendas” family, known for its daring and sometimes deadly stunts on the high wire, Nik Wallenda completed a tightrope walk that took him a quarter mile over the Little Colorado River Gorge in northeastern Arizona. He walked 1,500 feet above the river on the Navajo Nation near the Grand Canyon with no net or safety vest.

This feat was broadcast live on the Discovery Channel and had viewers around the world griping the arms of their chairs for more than 22-minutes. The life-or-death drama was further enhanced by the fact that viewers could hear Wallenda speaking to himself from the mobile microphone attached to the aerialist and see what he was seeing from a camera placed on the aerialist. Throughout the spectacle, he was heard praying and attempting to calm himself as the 40-miles per hour winds above the Grand Canyon buffeted his taunt cable.

After the stunt was completed, Wallenda was asked by the media to recount the things that were going on in his mind during his walk. He noted at one point during the walk he “knelt down and I thought of my great-grandfather and that everything I do is to honor him,” Wallenda said. “It took my mind off all this movement underneath me … and I was able to focus on him and regain composure.” Nik’s great-grandfather, Karl slipped and fell to his death from a high wire in Puerto Rico in 1978 when he was 73 years old.

Here’s is a brief video clip, courtesy of the Discovery Channel of Wallenda’s amazing walk across the Grand Canyon.

http://dsc.discovery.com/tv-shows/skywire-live-with-nik-wallenda/videos/final-moments-of-nik-wallendas-historic-walk.htm

Lack of Balance is a Big Healthcare Problem

Tightrope walkers such as Nik Wallenda have an uncanny sense of balance. How else could he and the rest of the Flying Wallendas successfully walk more than 1,400 feet on a steel cable no thicker than 2-inches?

Clearly, most people don’t have this superhuman sense of balance. In fact, many people struggle to keep their balance when walking on a perfectly flat surface. Why? Sometimes this is due to an inner-ear injury, but often this has to do with the effects of back pain.

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) notes that “in 2000, falls among older adults cost the U.S. health care system over $19 billion dollars or $30 billion in 2010 dollars. With the population aging, both the number of falls and the costs to treat fall injuries are likely to increase.”

The federal agency also notes:

  • One in three adults age 65 and older falls each year.
  • Of those who fall, 20% to 30% suffer moderate to severe injuries that make it hard for them to get around or live independently, and increase their risk of early death.
  • Older adults are hospitalized for fall-related injuries five times more often than they are for injuries from other causes.
  • In 2009, emergency departments treated 2.4 million nonfatal fall injuries among older adults; more than 662,000 of these patients had to be hospitalized.

How Does Back Pain Affect Balance?

As these healthcare costs suggest, this lack of balance is a problem which is both painful and expensive. We talked about balance and how it is affected by back pain with Texas Back Institute spine surgeon, Dr. Jessica Shellock.

shellockCan back pain cause a loss of balance?

Absolutely.  When someone suffers from back pain, there is usually some amount of muscular spasm or imbalance that can lead to an alteration in their overall spinal alignment. That’s going to present many times as a change in posture, such as the patient leaning to one side or even stooping forward. Sometimes on a radiograph we can see a subtle curvature of the spine that’s not scoliosis but actually a musculature imbalance because of pain. When we are unable to walk effectively then our balance will be hampered as well.

Does this lack of balance due to chronic back pain affect only older people, or do younger people have this problem as well?

Anybody in pain because of their low back, whether young or old, can be affected.  However, one issue that preferentially affects the older population is degenerative changes in the neck that can result in compression on the spinal cord.  This can also cause balance problems.

Here’s a quick video synopsis of Dr. Shellock’s thoughts on back pain and its effect on balance.

What are the back injuries or diseases that can cause a loss in balance?

Anything that can cause back pain, such as a herniated disc, pinched nerve, muscular strain or ligamentous sprain in the back can result in a loss of balance.  Degenerative changes in the neck or mid-back that create spinal stenosis, or pressure on the spinal cord, can result in a loss of balance.

How can these back problems, and the concurrent loss of balance, be corrected by surgery or therapy?

Understanding the source of the pain is key.  For example, if the cause of the limp is due to muscular pain or a ligamentous injury, physical therapy to address the problem and restore balance may be very successful. Alternatively, if compression of the spinal cord is causing the problem, we can take surgical actions to relieve this compression. In most cases, physical therapy can correct the root causes for muscular pain and misalignment of spine and also help many patients with pain from a herniated disc. Surgery is always the last resort in patients who’ve failed to respond to these more conservative measures.

Don’t Try This at Home

Walking across the Grand Canyon on a 2-inch steel cable is not something anyone – except maybe another Flying Wallenda – will do. The amazing sense of balance  Nik Wallenda showed was no doubt learned at an early age and could even be genetically determined. Most of us just want to be able to walk down a flight of stairs without taking a tumble.

If back pain is keeping you from maintaining your balance, it could be as simple as working on muscular strength with the specialists at Texas Back Institute’s physical therapy department. If  your condition is more serious, state-of-the-art diagnosis and appropriate therapy from our spine  specialists can have you back on the tight-wire of life sooner than you think!

Keith roberts collage

Two years ago, Keith Roberts was relocating his office. He began to feel immediate pain in his lower back after lifting a table. The pain became progressively worse from that point. His doctor told him it was just a sprain, but he soon learned more about his diagnosis.  After a regimen including rest and anti-inflammatory medications, he didn’t get better. “I’m a fairly active person and I knew there was something more to this,” he said. His first doctor ordered an MRI and the scan revealed a herniated disc. “My wife and I did a lot of research and we decided to try Texas Back Institute,” Keith said. “It was the best thing we’ve ever done.”

Keith made an appointment with Dr. Jessica Shellock and hasn’t looked back since. Texas Back Institute helped him navigate through the sometimes laborious paperwork involved with a worker’s compensation claim. “Without Dr. Shellock’s medical expertise and Tonya’s help with everything, I have no idea where I would be today.”  The Tonya he is referring to is Dr. Shellock’s medical assistant, Tonya Edwards. Medical Assistants are imperative to the delivery of healthcare for the providers at Texas Back Institute. They help obtain information about the patient including vital signs, medication, and their medical history.  They also assist the patient with future testing and appointments. “If it wasn’t for them, I wouldn’t have been able to get the surgery that I really needed to get better.”

After failing to respond to conservative treatment and without sustained relief following a microdiscectomy, Keith ultimately underwent a L5-S1 fusion in November 2012 with Dr. Shellock.  It was after progressive worsening of his symptoms at this point that I recommended the fusion,” said Dr. Shellock.  “He has done fantastic. “

He took three months off of work to recover properly and is now attending outpatient physical therapy sessions at TBI. He went from being very active to no activity and is now making a comeback. In April, he was able to complete his first 6-mile bike ride and this summer, his plans include a 12-mile hike in the Ozarks with his wife.  He and his wife are avid photographers and have donated art work for Dr. Shellock’s patient rooms.

“It’s amazing to go from being able to walk less than a half a mile and having so much pain to this,” said Keith. “I missed out on 2 years of my life and I would be missing more if it weren’t for Dr. Shellock.”

All of us are likely to experience back pain sometime during our lives. Here’s our Top 5 list of things women should do – or not do – to have a healthier back and neck:

Click your high heels less often. Yes, high heels make your legs look great, but they also unnaturally position your heels above your toes. This throws your entire body out of alignment. Over a long period of time, over-wearing high heels can cause severe low back and leg pain. Whether you’re traveling, at work or on the way to a cocktail party, wear comfortable flats, then make the switcheroo to heels when the time comes for the high-heel look.

Watch your cals. Try to shed a few pounds for the good of your back and overall health. Every pound you gain can add additional stress to the ligaments and muscles in your back. Extra weight in the tummy area pulls the pelvis forward and strains the lower back, which can create low back pain. Additionally, if you become quickly tired or have trouble breathing during exercise, it becomes harder for you to get the exercise you need that helps keep the pounds off. And if you’re carrying extra weight and wear high heels, you’ll greatly increase the odds for developing low back pain.

Find out if osteoporosis runs in your family:  You’re young and in great shape, so why should you worry about osteoporosis now?  It is estimated that about 75% of an individual’s peak bone mass is influenced by genetics. If you are genetically predisposed to osteoporosis, tell you doctor!  Also know that exercise, diet and regular testing are critically important for you to build up bone mass while you’re young and more able to do so. Young women should perform 20 to 30 minutes of aerobic exercise 3 to 4 times weekly to increase bone mass.

Bask in the glow of exercise while you’re pregnant.  Pregnancy is certainly one of the leading causes of back pain in women. If you’re pregnant, you should do stretching and strengthening exercises for your back before and during your pregnancy – always under the supervision of your doctor, of course. And if you do experience pain, don’t assume rest is the answer or it will be gone after the baby comes. Appropriate treatment can help you receive significant back pain relief during the pregnancy and lessen the chance of having chronic back pain in the lower back after the pregnancy.

Love your big bag but don’t use it like a suitcase. If your purse or satchel weighs more than 10% of your body weight, it’s too heavy – ask yourself, do I really need all of this stuff?  You also need to carry big bags correctly. We recommend you select a purse or briefcase with a long strap that allows you to carry it across your chest. And while we on the topic of big bags, shopaholics shouldn’t try to carry the day’s haul all at once – you won’t miss a sale if you deposit a bag on two in your car and return back to the hunt.

On My Style

April 15, 2011

This past week Dr. Zigler did a photo shoot at his house for ON Magazine.  The secton is called “ON my style” and it features things that showcase Dr. Zigler’s style. 

We think the spread turned out AWESOME!!!!

Dr. Shellock also did a spread like this in 2009. 

It so fun getting to know more about the doctors personal interests and style.

 

What things help demonstrate your style and personality?

Super Doctors!!!!

March 23, 2011

Living magazine recently did a feature in their March issue showcasing “Super Docs” throughout the community.  Well guess who made it on the list….Texas Back Institute. Congratulations on being “SUPER“!

Our Plano physicians

 

Dr. Henry and Dr. Duffy

Dr. Gibbs, Dr. Lankford and Dr. Guyer at our Trophy Club office

 

 

Dr. Belanger, our newest physician at our Rockwall office

 

Our Flower Mound and Denton physicians, Dr. Arakal, Dr. Bradley, Dr. Marchetti and Dr. Bosita

We know finding a spine specialist can be a complex process and our goal is to make it as easy as possible.  With 20 physicians and 14 convenient locations throughout the metroplex – let us help you get back to life!

 

Plano! 

Check out our new radio commercial. What do you think? Did you know Texas Back Institute has trained over 90 spine surgeons now practicing in the US?  Did you know TBI surgeons performed the first artificial disc replacement, have written over 200 articles for scientific journals and have pioneered numerous minimally invasive surgical techniques? 

Sounds like the work of Super Heroes to me!

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