group getting their fantasy football draftFor anyone who is an avid sports fan, this is a great time of year. The baseball pennant races are full-bore, the college football season has kicked off and the 94th season of the National Football League (NFL) begins on Thursday night, September 5, 2013. Six months later, on February 2, 2014, the NFL season will end with the crowning of a champion team of Super Bowl XLVIII.

Between now and February, a curious addiction will befall many otherwise sane men and women who enjoy following professional football. They will be consumed with the stats of players who most likely don’t even play for their favorite teams. They will spend many hours studying obscure facts such as how well a given running back performs on artificial turf versus real grass. They will struggle to juggle all-star lineups to best take advantage of a scoring system that approaches the complexity of the U.S. Tax Code.

Unlike the treatment delivered by the specialists at Texas Back Institute to patients with back pain, herniated discs or other back problems, there is really no cure for this football sickness. These lost souls are smitten by the phenomenon of playing fantasy football!

Consuming Football Facts

It may not surprise you to learn fantasy football is a very big business. It is estimated by the Fantasy Sports Trade Association that 32 million people, aged twelve and older in the U.S. and Canada, play fantasy sports. The trade group notes that fantasy football players make up 90% of the fantasy sports “industry.” This participation has grown by over 60% the last four years with 19% of males in the U.S. playing fantasy sports.

Because of this high level of participation many consumer products companies such as Sprint, Yahoo, ESPN, Fox and others have invested millions of dollars in fantasy football services and promotions. The two groups who usually disagree about almost everything associated with professional football – NFL properties (composed of the team owners) and NFL Players (the players’ union) – have both created products and services that encourage fans to play fantasy football.

The Texas Back Institute Dream Team 

Most of the fun of playing fantasy football involves choosing a “dream team” from a group of outstanding players. There are no bad football players in the NFL. They’re all good. Therefore, getting to choose the best of the best for one’s own team can be great fun.

In a similar fashion, the spine specialists at Texas Back Institute are the best in their class and as such, there are only great choices. In celebration of the hundreds of thousands of fantasy drafts in full-swing at this moment, we thought we’d introduce you to our dream team.

History of the Team:

Texas Back Institute was formed in 1977 by Stephen Hochschuler, M.D., Ralph Rashbaum, M.D. and Richard Guyer, M.D. The organization is internationally recognized for excellence for spine injuries. In football terms, this team plays offense and defense equally well and the patients are the big winners.

The Texas Back Institute Fantasy Team:

As with NFL teams, the Texas Back Institute team is composed of the best of the best of spine surgery, research and therapy. The game plan for our team has been consistent for more than 35 years. Each patient injury or condition is unique and is best treated with the most minimally invasive approach.

Here’s a brief “draft” report on each of the Texas Back Institute physicians.

arakal0Rajesh G. Arakal, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Arakal and other TBI surgeons to your team if you need thorough evaluation and treatment of cervical, thoracic and lumbar pathology.

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Theodore Belanger, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Belanger and other TBI back experts to your team if you want a spine specialist who evaluates each patient and their situation carefully and makes treatment recommendations based on their goals.

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Andrew R. Block, Ph.D., A.B.P.P.

Specialties: Psychologist

Add Dr. Block to your team if you need to overcome emotional difficulties of surgery, deal with stress and control medications to achieve the best surgical outcomes.

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Scott L. Blumenthal, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Blumenthal and other TBI back specialists to your team if you believe the goal of a spine surgeon is to get his patients back to life using the most advanced motion-preserving technologies, including lumbar and cervical artificial discs as well as posterior dynamic stabilization.

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Rey Bosita, M.D., M.B.A.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Bosita and other TBI physicians to your team if you want to be treated with respect and have your fears about neck and back pain removed.

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W. Daniel Bradley, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Dr. Bradley along with every other TBI specialist should be on your team if you feel treatment should use the latest in motion preservation and minimally invasive surgical techniques.

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James D. Cable, M.D.

Specialties: Occupational & Sports Medicine

Add Dr. Cable to your team for occupational and sports medicine issues. He knows wear and tear eventually affect all of us but most back pain is manageable with proper care.

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Michael F. Duffy, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Duffy to your team if you agree that we should get busy living! His goal and that of the other spine specialists at TBI is to deliver effective spinal care to patients in order for them to return to doing what it is that makes them happy.

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Sharon J. Gibbs, M.D.

Specialties: Physiatrist

Add Dr. Gibbs to your team if being in pain affects many aspects of your life. As a physiatrist she works hard to provide patients with the best comprehensive non-surgical care.

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Richard D. Guyer, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

As one of the founding physicians of Texas Back Institute, Dr. Guyer is both a player and a coach for new team members. Add him to your team if you agree with his “family test” philosophy – treating patients the way he would want his family members to be treated.

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Shawn M. Henry, D.O.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Dr. Henry and the other spine specialists at TBI should be on your team if you want to be treated with the most advanced technology and treatment available for your condition; holding surgery as a last resort.

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Michael S. Hisey, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Hisey to your team if you feel the goal of neck and back treatment is to return patients to productive and pain-free activity using the most advanced minimally invasive and motion-preserving techniques.

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Stephen H. Hochschuler, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Hochschuler and the other spine surgeons at Texas Back Institute to your team if you have lumbar spinal problems or have had a failed spinal procedure.

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Effat Jehan, M.D.

Specialties: Spine Triage Specialist

Add Dr. Jehan and the other specialists at TBI to your team if you feel the goal should be to help treat not only back and neck issues but also to provide effective coordinated support to help patients get through every day of life without any stresses related to their condition.

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Craig Lankford, M.D.

Specialties: Physiatrist

If you want to be treated with respect, compassion, add Dr. Lankford and every other physician at TBI to your team. He can help you understand how pain affects your everyday life in order to help you get back to life.

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Isador Lieberman, M.D., M.B.A., FRCSC

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Lieberman and the other spine surgery experts at TBI to you team if you want to be treated as if you were the only patient we have.

marchetti

Jason Marchetti, M.D.

Specialties: Physiatrist

If you believe in ethical treatment and the importance of educating patients regarding all available treatment options, you should consider adding Dr. Marchetti and the other spine specialists at TBI to your team.

patel

Nayan R. Patel, M.D.

Specialties: Physiatrists

Add Dr. Patel to you team if you think patients should be treated in the same way a physician treats his own family.

rashbaum

Ralph F. Rashbaum, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon, Pain Management

Add Dr. Rashbaum and the other spine surgery specialists at TBI to your team if you want a timely response to back conditions which leads to predictable outcomes.

shellock

Jessica Shellock, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Shellock to you team if you think it’s time to take your life back, with minimally invasive treatment. Along with the other experts on the TBI team, she is highly trained in the latest procedures.

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Stephen R. Tolhurst, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

If you want a doctor who sees surgery as a last resort and is dedicated to returning you to the lifestyle you had before the back pain, you want Dr. Tolhurst on your team.

zigler

Jack E. Zigler, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeons

Add Dr. Zigler and the other spine surgeons at TBI to your team if think surgery should be the last resort. However, if it’s required, he’s one of the best spine surgeons in the U.S.

Choosing Your Team

There are literally hundreds of ways to set up your league and arrange for a draft of NFL players. The best advice for those new to this pastime is to understand how the players’ performance will be scored each week. This will help determine the number of running backs, wide receivers, tight ends to choose. For example, in some leagues, the yardage gained by running backs is weighted higher than the passing yardage of quarterbacks.

One should also be aware of the “bye” weeks each team has (when they are not playing) because this will mean a player on the team with the bye, will not play that week and should not be in the lineup.  Here’s a good primer  on choosing your fantasy team.

Fortunately, choosing a spine specialist is much easier than choosing a fantasy football team! With more than 35 years of excellence in spine treatments, management of many FDA trials and a foundation of minimally invasive treatment, the dream team of physicians at Texas Back Institute is championship caliber.

It’s back to school time again, and each year many children get a new backpack to carry supplies, books, and homework. These carry-all backpacks often reflect the personality of the child, with many adorned with super heroes, princesses and more than a few Angry Birds.

back-to-school2While this efficient carrying case has been around for many years and has been used by millions of students both old and young, back experts such as Texas Back Institute physician Dr. Rey Bosita have noticed a problem with backpacks. They’re too heavy for some kids, and can cause long-term serious back problems.

We spent a few minutes with Dr. Bosita to get some guidelines on the proper size and use of backpacks. More on this later.

Backpacks Have a Colorful History

Backpacks, in one form or another, have been around since early humans used animal skins to carry meat from hunting trips. Just as with the school kids of today, these packs allowed prehistoric hunters to use the strong muscles in their backs to carry much more game for longer distances than if they were carrying it in their arms alone.

Historians note that the term “backpack” was coined by Americans around 1910; however, before it was known as a backpack, Europeans (specifically the Germans) called this carry-all a “rucksack,” which is a shortened version of the phrase “der Rucken” – German for “the human back.”

Up until the 1950’s, the backpack was primarily used for hunting and military purposes. These early versions were made of rugged materials and very heavy to carry. All of this changed when hiker Dick Kelty realized backpacks could serve a valuable function to the participants of his sport. He began experimenting with creating packs made of lighter materials and more compact designs. He also changed the weight distribution of the backpacks – by putting the skids of the pack in the back pockets of his hiking pants – allowing the hips to carry more of the load.

With this change, anyone who needed to carry several items while they were walking could pack these in a backpack and be on their way. It didn’t take long for parents and students to discover  these same, light-weight backpacks were ideal carrying cases for schoolbooks and homework papers.

The Problem with Backpacks

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For all of its efficiency, the modern backpack has its detractors, some of whom are backspecialists. In an article published in 2012 in the New York Times, it was noted that “heavy backpacks don’t just zap children of energy that might be better used doing schoolwork or playing sports. Lugging them can also lead to chronic back pain, accidents and possibly lifelong orthopedic damage.”

In this article on the dangers of backpacks for kids, the federal Consumer Product Safety Commission calculated that “carrying a 12-pound backpack to and from school and lifting it 10 times a day for an entire school year puts a cumulative load on youngsters’ bodies of 21,600 pounds – the equivalent of six mid-sized cars.”

In a 2012 report in the “Archives of Disease in Childhood,” researchers in Spain assessed the backpacks and back health of 1,403 pupils, ages 12 to 17. More than 60 percent were carrying packs weighing more than 10 percent of their body weight, and nearly one in five had schoolbags that weighed more than 15 percent of their own weight.

This study found that “1 in 4 students said they had suffered back pain for more than 15 days during the previous year; scoliosis – curvature of the spine – accounted for 70 percent of those with pain. The remaining 30 percent had either low back pain or contractures – continuous, involuntary muscle contractions.” Girls faced a greater risk of back pain than boys, and their risk increased with age.

Clearly, there is a potential problem with backpacks and kids. In many cases, they are either too heavy for the size of the child or they are being worn by the child incorrectly. We spoke with Dr. Rey Bosita, a spine specialist with Texas Back Institute, to get an idea on the “dos and don’ts” for backpacks with kids.

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Dr. Bosita noted pain often results when the weight of the pack pulls children backward, prompting them to bend forward or to arch their backs to keep the pack centered. These positions make the back muscles work harder and increase pressure on vertebrae on the discs between them.

If the child has to lean forward or seems unsteady when walking with a loaded pack, it’s too heavy.  This can lead to poor posture and shoulder pain.  Neck pain can also occur when the child is forced to look up from this position.

No parent or teacher wants a child to be injured by a backpack which is too heavy. So, what should be done to correct this situation? Dr. Bosita has some ideas.

Tips You Can Use for Back Safety and Backpacks

“The first thing we should look at is how the backpack fits the child and how he/she is standing while wearing it fully-loaded. The child should be standing straight up – with shoulders back. The backpack should be positioned in a manner that allows it to rest against the child’s back, straps a little tighter, so that the pack doesn’t sag too low,” Dr. Bosita notes.

Another important consideration for back safety is the weight of the backpack. What is the correct weight for a child’s backpack and how does a parent determine the weight of the pack? Dr. Bosita says, “The easiest way to determine the acceptable weight of the pack is to get the family scales out and weigh the child without his/her backpack. The weight of the backpack should be no more than 10 to 15 percent of the child’s weight. Therefore, if the child weighs 50 pounds, the backpack should not weigh more than 5 to 7 pounds.”

“Remember, everything adds weight to the backpack, including the pack itself, Dr. Bosita notes. “It’s a good idea to check the backpack weight with all of the materials connected to the pack (water bottles, knick knacks) and the books and school supplies being carried in the backpack (library books, binders).”

For the complete video of Dr. Bosita’s tips on backpacks, just click here 

Pack Only What’s Needed

When given the chance, younger children will stuff as many things as possible in their backpacks, much of which is not related to school work. Parents should take a minute each morning and afternoon to inventory the items being transported to and from school. If there are toys, games, handheld computer games, pet rocks, frogs and other non-academic items being packed in the bag, remind the child that these things should be left at home.

If he or she disagrees about the contents of the backpack, have a Plan B. Just tell them that you want them to grow up straight and tall and a heavy backpack might keep this from happening. This has the advantage of being the truth.

And if this fails, reward them with a treat  if they keep the back pack light.

All Star Back Care

July 15, 2013

MLBallstargame

When Dr. Rey Bosita of The Texas Back Institute talks about back health and baseball, his voice reveals his passion for both subjects. He clearly loves the game and his medical profession. This makes Dr. Bosita the ideal source to share information and opinions about the 2013 Major League Baseball All-Star game and how these athletes deal with back injuries.

Since Texas Back Institute is the Official Spine Specialist for the Frisco RoughRiders, the AA affiliate of the Texas Rangers baseball club, Bosita knows all about baseball-oriented back injuries. Before getting his thoughts on back injuries and ball players, let’s take a brief look at the 2013 MLB All-Star game.

The Fan Favorites

This year’s All-Star game will be played at Citi Field in New York City, the home field for the National Leagues New York Mets, on Tuesday evening, July 16, 2013. As always, the game will be nationally televised on Fox and the festivities begin at 7 p.m. (Central).

The MLB All-Star game owes much of its popularity to the fact that professional baseball fans can vote on the players who will take the field. Of course, this “popularity contest” format has gotten negative comments in the past – particularly from traditional baseball fans who feel that a player’s on-field abilities and performance in the first half of the season, rather than his name identification – more often than not, the popular vote reflects what type of season the starting lineup players are having. A great example of this is Baltimore Oriole’s first baseman, Chris Davis.

After being traded from the Texas Rangers to the O’s, Davis is having a remarkable year at the plate – 85 RBIs and 33 homeruns. In the All-Star voting, he finished with 8,272,243 fan votes to edge out last year’s triple-crown winner, Miguel Cabrera of the Detroit Tigers, who amassed 8,013,874 votes. Since neither plays for teams in large metropolitan markets, where vote totals can be manipulated by in-stadium promotions and both are having great years, it appears the fans made the correct, non-partisan, decision.

On the National League side, St. Louis catcher Yadier Molina was the leading vote-getter and he joins 4 other Cardinal teammates to make the Midseason Classic lineup. The NL player who has gotten lots of attention for his amazing season after being called up from the Los Angeles Dodgers minor league team, Yasiel Puig, failed to make the All-Star team this year.

2013 Major League Baseball All-Star Starting Lineups

The American League Starters include:

Joe Mauer (C – Twins)

Chris Davis (1-B – Orioles)

Robinson Cano (2-B – Yankees)

J.J. Hardy (SS – Orioles)

Miguel Cabrera (3-B – Tigers)

Mike Trout (OF – Angles)

Adam Jones (OF – Orioles)

Jose Bautista (OF – Blue Jays)

David Ortiz (DH – Red Sox)

For the National League:

Yadier Molina (Catcher – Cardinals)

Joey Votta (1B – Reds)

Brandon Phillips (2B – Reds)

Troy Tulowitzki (SS – Rockies)

David Wright (3B – Mets)

Carlos Beltran (OF – Cardinals)

Carlos Gonzales (OF – Rockies)

Bryce Harper (OF – Nationals)

Over the course of their careers, most if not all of these All-Stars have had to deal with injuries and some have been serious. Unlike football, baseball is considered a non-contact sport. However, there are more than a few collisions between runners trying to make it home and catcher trying to guard the plate and the constant swinging and throwing can take its toll on these athletes. Injuries to the spine and back are very common in this sport and we talked with Texas Back Institute surgeon, Dr. Rey Bosita to shed some light on how playing baseball can be dangerous to your back health.

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Now Batting – Dr. Rey Bosita

Dr. Bosita was between appointments when we caught up with him and asked him about the most common back ailments for professional baseball players. He said, “Lumbar sprains and other muscular strains are the most common back problems for baseball players. However, the most serious injury is a disc herniation. This involves the damage to the disc, which cushions the vertebra in the spinal column. When a player has a herniated disc, there is intense pain and any movement – whether it’s swinging a bat or throwing a baseball – almost impossible.”

So, what causes a herniated disc?

Dr. Bosita noted, “It can occur as a result of repetitive stress, for example if a player is swinging a bat for hundreds of times each week. A disc can be herniated when a player takes a powerful swing and misses or it can be the result of a collision on the base paths.”

Texas Back Institute is the Official Spine Specialist for the Frisco RoughRiders team and because they are just starting their careers in professional baseball, these players tend to be younger than those in the “big show” in Major League Baseball. Does the age of a player have any effect on the likelihood of back injuries?

“Definitely,” notes Dr. Bosita. “Older players have much more wear and tear on their back muscles, discs and vertebra and the constant repetitive stress from playing more than 160 games a year can gradually wear down these back muscles and cartilage. Plus, younger players tend to be in better condition and their muscles can withstand the quick starts and stops of baseball.”

Bosita was quick to note that some older players such as retired Baltimore infielder Cal Ripkin showed remarkable conditioning and ability to play with pain. “During his famous and historic complete games run, Ripkin played with a lumbar compression. This would have incapacitated most players, but Ripkin continued to play every day with this condition.”

What type of conditioning exercises do professional baseball players use to avoid the back sprains and other, more serious injuries?

Dr. Bosita said, “Cross training exercises which are designed to improve flexibility and strength and proper pre-workout stretching and post-workout cool downs are the most important elements of a conditioning regimen. Since baseball players are required to go from a complete stop to full-speed at the crack of a bat, it’s important that they remain loose even when they are in the dugout. Stretching will help with this.”

The All-Star Team at Texas Back Institute

The All-Stars who take to the field on July 16th are at the very top of their profession. Their conditioning is impeccable and their knowledge of potential injuries is extensive. And yet, the odds are very good that at some time, in the course of a season, they will experience a back injury that can potentially end their season or career.

If these athletes, with all of their physical conditioning and knowledge can be sidelined by back injury, it goes without saying that non-athletes can also experience the pain and physical limitation of back injury or pain. When this happens, it’s a good idea to go to the specialists – the All Stars – who deal with these issues every day: Texas Back Institute.

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For Father’s Day 2013, forget about neckties and golf balls as gifts!  Rather, remind yourself of this…

What are the most important things your father ever gave you?  Most likely it wasn’t a set of golf clubs, your first car or anything tangible.  Perhaps you can thank Dad for your witty sense of humor, problem-solving ability or knowing right from wrong.  These are the most valuable things we carry with us for the rest of our lives.  Show Dad your gratitude by giving him something just as important.

At Texas Back Institute, we’re focused on overall spine health.  As anyone who has ever experienced back and neck pain knows, a healthy spine is crucial to one’s quality of life.  “Use Father’s Day as a spring board for a new way of living,” suggests Dr. Rey Bosita, a Texas Back Institute spine surgeon, who himself is a father of four  young boys.  From that perspective, we recommend healthy activities and actions that will be a meaningful investment in your relationship with Dad.

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Dr. Bosita and his family are sure to have an active Father’s Day!

Go on walks together.  This will not only enhance your general well-being but will boost your neck and back health as well. “Ask your dad about his health and fitness habits.  If your dad has been sedentary, start off easy and build yourself up to longer and faster walks.  Most importantly, make a commitment to your dad to walk with him regularly.  Consistency over time is what will improve his and your health.”

Taking walks together also fosters conversation.  Dr. Bosita notes that “walking and talking can help reduce stress and emotional pain which is usually carried in people’s neck and back.”

Commit to Annual Exams.  And follow through!   Serious health issues can usually be prevented if discovered early.  We all know dear old Dad sometimes avoids going to the doctor.  Make it a family affair and follow with a lunch date!

Or better yet, do what Dr. Bosita did with his dad.  He made it a Guys Day Out!  The day started with morning golf followed by lunch.  The tour of check-up appointments followed, from 1-5pm that afternoon, including “the dentist, eye doctor, primary care physician and a specialist,” says Dr. Bosita.  And naturally one works up an appetite after all of that, so he and his dad finished the day at their favorite steak house for dinner.  Father/son time and investment in your quality of life all in one day – pretty good by any measure!

“You have to create the same efficiencies in your health care as you do in your job everyday.  It’s all about commitment.  Time and money are the same thing.  Put them where your heart is,” advises Dr. Bosita.

Summon the child within.  What are the activities you enjoyed as a child with your father?  What are the activities he enjoyed with his father as child?  Consider bringing out the fishing poles and dusting off the tent.  Or perhaps your dad likes strolling art galleries or working on a project.  Whatever it is, do it together.

Dr. Bosita brought along the grandparents with his family to Disney World!  He laughed saying, “my father-in-law sure got his exercise walking all around the Magic Kingdom and Epcot Center- while pushing strollers and carrying kids. It was tough but it was great to spend time together as a family.”

In fact, older adults make up many of Texas Back Institute’s patients.    They often seek out preventive measures for the sole purpose of being active with their adult children and grandchildren.  Physical therapy at Texas Back Institute is integral to this approach.   Physical therapy helps prepare you or your older parents for carrying luggage or children, handling squirmy toddlers or playing in the pool. The benefits include “improvements in core strength and endurance, cardiovascular fitness and proper lifting mechanics,” says Dr. Bosita.  So, by planning ahead for such a trip, you will enjoy your experience more fully by being physically prepared.

Dr. Bosita observes that “there are many common neck and back conditions, which surface as we age, like chronic back pain, herniated discs, degenerative disc disease and others.”  However, he continues, “It is never too late.”  Start this weekend with Dad.  He may wear a tie you give him once a year.  But sharing a life full of wholesome activities and meaningful relationships will certainly be his life’s treasure.

 

 

 

 

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