group getting their fantasy football draftFor anyone who is an avid sports fan, this is a great time of year. The baseball pennant races are full-bore, the college football season has kicked off and the 94th season of the National Football League (NFL) begins on Thursday night, September 5, 2013. Six months later, on February 2, 2014, the NFL season will end with the crowning of a champion team of Super Bowl XLVIII.

Between now and February, a curious addiction will befall many otherwise sane men and women who enjoy following professional football. They will be consumed with the stats of players who most likely don’t even play for their favorite teams. They will spend many hours studying obscure facts such as how well a given running back performs on artificial turf versus real grass. They will struggle to juggle all-star lineups to best take advantage of a scoring system that approaches the complexity of the U.S. Tax Code.

Unlike the treatment delivered by the specialists at Texas Back Institute to patients with back pain, herniated discs or other back problems, there is really no cure for this football sickness. These lost souls are smitten by the phenomenon of playing fantasy football!

Consuming Football Facts

It may not surprise you to learn fantasy football is a very big business. It is estimated by the Fantasy Sports Trade Association that 32 million people, aged twelve and older in the U.S. and Canada, play fantasy sports. The trade group notes that fantasy football players make up 90% of the fantasy sports “industry.” This participation has grown by over 60% the last four years with 19% of males in the U.S. playing fantasy sports.

Because of this high level of participation many consumer products companies such as Sprint, Yahoo, ESPN, Fox and others have invested millions of dollars in fantasy football services and promotions. The two groups who usually disagree about almost everything associated with professional football – NFL properties (composed of the team owners) and NFL Players (the players’ union) – have both created products and services that encourage fans to play fantasy football.

The Texas Back Institute Dream Team 

Most of the fun of playing fantasy football involves choosing a “dream team” from a group of outstanding players. There are no bad football players in the NFL. They’re all good. Therefore, getting to choose the best of the best for one’s own team can be great fun.

In a similar fashion, the spine specialists at Texas Back Institute are the best in their class and as such, there are only great choices. In celebration of the hundreds of thousands of fantasy drafts in full-swing at this moment, we thought we’d introduce you to our dream team.

History of the Team:

Texas Back Institute was formed in 1977 by Stephen Hochschuler, M.D., Ralph Rashbaum, M.D. and Richard Guyer, M.D. The organization is internationally recognized for excellence for spine injuries. In football terms, this team plays offense and defense equally well and the patients are the big winners.

The Texas Back Institute Fantasy Team:

As with NFL teams, the Texas Back Institute team is composed of the best of the best of spine surgery, research and therapy. The game plan for our team has been consistent for more than 35 years. Each patient injury or condition is unique and is best treated with the most minimally invasive approach.

Here’s a brief “draft” report on each of the Texas Back Institute physicians.

arakal0Rajesh G. Arakal, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Arakal and other TBI surgeons to your team if you need thorough evaluation and treatment of cervical, thoracic and lumbar pathology.

Belanger_MD_small

Theodore Belanger, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Belanger and other TBI back experts to your team if you want a spine specialist who evaluates each patient and their situation carefully and makes treatment recommendations based on their goals.

Block_PhD_Small

Andrew R. Block, Ph.D., A.B.P.P.

Specialties: Psychologist

Add Dr. Block to your team if you need to overcome emotional difficulties of surgery, deal with stress and control medications to achieve the best surgical outcomes.

blumenthal

Scott L. Blumenthal, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Blumenthal and other TBI back specialists to your team if you believe the goal of a spine surgeon is to get his patients back to life using the most advanced motion-preserving technologies, including lumbar and cervical artificial discs as well as posterior dynamic stabilization.

bosita

Rey Bosita, M.D., M.B.A.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Bosita and other TBI physicians to your team if you want to be treated with respect and have your fears about neck and back pain removed.

bradley

W. Daniel Bradley, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Dr. Bradley along with every other TBI specialist should be on your team if you feel treatment should use the latest in motion preservation and minimally invasive surgical techniques.

cable

James D. Cable, M.D.

Specialties: Occupational & Sports Medicine

Add Dr. Cable to your team for occupational and sports medicine issues. He knows wear and tear eventually affect all of us but most back pain is manageable with proper care.

duff_small

Michael F. Duffy, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Duffy to your team if you agree that we should get busy living! His goal and that of the other spine specialists at TBI is to deliver effective spinal care to patients in order for them to return to doing what it is that makes them happy.

gibbs

Sharon J. Gibbs, M.D.

Specialties: Physiatrist

Add Dr. Gibbs to your team if being in pain affects many aspects of your life. As a physiatrist she works hard to provide patients with the best comprehensive non-surgical care.

guyer

Richard D. Guyer, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

As one of the founding physicians of Texas Back Institute, Dr. Guyer is both a player and a coach for new team members. Add him to your team if you agree with his “family test” philosophy – treating patients the way he would want his family members to be treated.

Henry_MD_web_1

Shawn M. Henry, D.O.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Dr. Henry and the other spine specialists at TBI should be on your team if you want to be treated with the most advanced technology and treatment available for your condition; holding surgery as a last resort.

hisey

Michael S. Hisey, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Hisey to your team if you feel the goal of neck and back treatment is to return patients to productive and pain-free activity using the most advanced minimally invasive and motion-preserving techniques.

hochschuler

Stephen H. Hochschuler, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Hochschuler and the other spine surgeons at Texas Back Institute to your team if you have lumbar spinal problems or have had a failed spinal procedure.

Jehan_85x85_1

Effat Jehan, M.D.

Specialties: Spine Triage Specialist

Add Dr. Jehan and the other specialists at TBI to your team if you feel the goal should be to help treat not only back and neck issues but also to provide effective coordinated support to help patients get through every day of life without any stresses related to their condition.

lankford

Craig Lankford, M.D.

Specialties: Physiatrist

If you want to be treated with respect, compassion, add Dr. Lankford and every other physician at TBI to your team. He can help you understand how pain affects your everyday life in order to help you get back to life.

lieberman

Isador Lieberman, M.D., M.B.A., FRCSC

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Lieberman and the other spine surgery experts at TBI to you team if you want to be treated as if you were the only patient we have.

marchetti

Jason Marchetti, M.D.

Specialties: Physiatrist

If you believe in ethical treatment and the importance of educating patients regarding all available treatment options, you should consider adding Dr. Marchetti and the other spine specialists at TBI to your team.

patel

Nayan R. Patel, M.D.

Specialties: Physiatrists

Add Dr. Patel to you team if you think patients should be treated in the same way a physician treats his own family.

rashbaum

Ralph F. Rashbaum, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon, Pain Management

Add Dr. Rashbaum and the other spine surgery specialists at TBI to your team if you want a timely response to back conditions which leads to predictable outcomes.

shellock

Jessica Shellock, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Shellock to you team if you think it’s time to take your life back, with minimally invasive treatment. Along with the other experts on the TBI team, she is highly trained in the latest procedures.

Tolhurst_MD_web

Stephen R. Tolhurst, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

If you want a doctor who sees surgery as a last resort and is dedicated to returning you to the lifestyle you had before the back pain, you want Dr. Tolhurst on your team.

zigler

Jack E. Zigler, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeons

Add Dr. Zigler and the other spine surgeons at TBI to your team if think surgery should be the last resort. However, if it’s required, he’s one of the best spine surgeons in the U.S.

Choosing Your Team

There are literally hundreds of ways to set up your league and arrange for a draft of NFL players. The best advice for those new to this pastime is to understand how the players’ performance will be scored each week. This will help determine the number of running backs, wide receivers, tight ends to choose. For example, in some leagues, the yardage gained by running backs is weighted higher than the passing yardage of quarterbacks.

One should also be aware of the “bye” weeks each team has (when they are not playing) because this will mean a player on the team with the bye, will not play that week and should not be in the lineup.  Here’s a good primer  on choosing your fantasy team.

Fortunately, choosing a spine specialist is much easier than choosing a fantasy football team! With more than 35 years of excellence in spine treatments, management of many FDA trials and a foundation of minimally invasive treatment, the dream team of physicians at Texas Back Institute is championship caliber.

Day 10 – Ebola?

Today we only had one case booked at Mulago hospital. We all woke up in the morning a little bit unsettled because we had all heard conflicting stories as to what the state of Mulago was in regard to the Ebola situation. Although most of the stories involved New Mulago, which is a part of the greater Mulago hospital, but located a short distance away, we were still not completely clear what was true and what was hearsay  As it stood, only half of the team was meant to go to Mulago to work on the case. There definitely seemed to be some tension within the team because it seemed like people were unhappy about this situation, but no one was speaking up. Thankfully, before we headed out, there was a team meeting called where we were told what was shared with Dr. Lieberman from the acting director of Mulago Hospital, and from his perspective it was safe for us to go in and perform the operation.

Off we went in the van, the group of us scheduled to do the case at Mulago. This case was an idiopathic scoliosis instrumentation, reduction and fusion on a 21-year-old female. Despite being slightly nervous about the Ebola situation, we all pulled together as a team and supported each other, mostly with lighthearted humor about the situation, and got through the case very successfully.

Day 11 – Last Day of Surgery at Mulago

Today there were two cases planned, one at each of the hospitals. At Case Hospital, we had planned to perform a difficult procedure on a 3-year-old female with a mass in the cervical region of her spinal cord. Knowing the delicate nature of this procedure, Dr. Holman had organized late last week to have some of his more specialized neurosurgery equipment shipped from the United States to help perform this procedure. Unfortunately, although it appeared that the shipment had arrived in Uganda, it was being held up by customs, and thus we were unable to obtain it. Consequently, this case had to be cancelled. This was such a frustrating outcome, after having planned to perform this procedure, and hopefully make a real difference for this little’s girl life, but instead the Ugandan government prevented this from happening.

While the Case half of the team were dealing with their setbacks, the other half of the team was working on a case at Mulago on a 50-year-old female with a suspected infection in her spine. This group at Mulago also faced their own set of obstacles in trying to undertake this case. When we arrived in the morning we found that the instruments we needed for the procedure had not yet been sterilized, and furthermore, the truck that was supposed to come and pick it all up to take it to where it can be sterilized, was out of gas. As we waited around for the necessary equipment, we rounded on patients, caught up on writing operative reports, grabbed a quick power nap, and Dr. Ughwanogho cracked the whip to ensure our patients were getting their post-operative x-rays after being told that they couldn’t get them because they had to pay for them themselves. Dr. Ughwanogho’s persistence paid off and sure enough, before we knew it we had all of the post-operative x-rays.

Finally, at around 1 pm, we had our instruments sterilized and returned, the patient was ready, and we began the case under the very competent leadership of Dr. Ughwanogho, with assistance from two Ugandan orthopedic residents. There was some uncertainty going into this case because this particular patient had been investigated for an infected process in her spine, but we did not know exactly what we would find. What we did find was a very inflamed spine, with cavitating lesions. Due to the precarious state of this patient’s bones, likely due to underlying  osteoporosis, this case took longer than we had anticipated; plus, we had had a considerable late start. Bottom line, it was a late night at Mulago, and when we finally had finished it was around 8 pm.

The rest of the team had gone to an evening reception, hosted by the Mulago administration, but as we had had a long and frustrating day, exhausted and starving, we headed home and went out to grab a late dinner. We eventually met up with the rest of the team at the apartments and discussed the trials and tribulations of the day, but encouraged by the positive outcome for the patient. Moreover, I think this was an important day for Dr. Ughwanogho, as he was able to reaffirm to himself just how talented and competent he is as a young orthopedic surgeon, even in the most adverse conditions.

Day 12 – Last Day in Uganda

Today, our last day in Uganda, was spent operating on a 5-year-old male with congenital scoliosis at Case Hospital. While half of the team was at Case operating, the other half of the team went to Mulago to wrap up any loose ends, check in on post-operative patients, and clean up our equipment. Once we had finished up at Mulago, we bid a bittersweet farewell to this place that had quickly become a home away from home for several of us. Although we had only been there for two weeks it became very apparent to us that we had established very strong and special relationships with the health care staff we had been working alongside; not to mention the relationships we had formed with the patients we had operated on and were now on their way to recovery. To me there was definitely a sentiment of this trip not being long enough. It seemed like just when we were starting to get into the swing of things, and starting to really mesh with the Mulago staff, it was time to go. Afterall, there is always more we could do.

Once we had finished up at Mulago, those of us who were not part of the operating team at Case went home to work on outstanding reports, sorting of the thousands of pictures that will be necessary to supplement the trip report, and catching up on other odds and ends. However, our ability to do work was interrupted by a building-wide power outage. Thankfully a generator was brought in, but only lasted as long as a full tank of gas, and then we were once again powerless. This made for more of relaxing afternoon that we had anticipated, but we were not too upset about that!

The operating team finished up the case successfully and without any complications. Upon their arrival home, we all packed up, sorted out the equipment that would be getting shipped back to the United States, and cleaned up the apartments, as we had an early morning departure on Friday morning. After all of our dirty work was completed, we gathered for our final team dinner at a restaurant called The Lawn. It was a lovely evening, with great food, drink, company and lasting stories and memories shared among us all. As usual we shared our personal lessons, but this time it was the lesson of the trip. Although we all shared very profound and meaningful lessons, it became obvious to me that this trip could never be summed up in a single lesson. Each of us has learned invaluable lessons from our patients, colleagues, from the Ugandan way of life as a whole; and more importantly learned more about ourselves than we probably even know. It is my hope that these lessons and memories remain strong and fresh in my mind for years to come.

Uganda Mission

November 6, 2012

Day 9 – Second Week Begins

Contributed by Erin Sadler

                Today marked the beginning of the second week of surgery. We had procedures taking place at both Mulago and Case Hospitals. At Case Hospital, Dr. Lieberman was performing a revision of hardware. At Mulago, Dr. Ughwanogho, one of Dr. Lieberman’s fellows, completed his first case on his own. He did a fantastic job operating on a 20 year old male with a cervical burst fracture. It was not only his surgical competency that I was so impressed by, but earlier in the day while he was rounding, Dr. Ughwanogho blew me away. It was during his interaction with a young man who had been in a motorcycle accident and had an odontoid fracture in his neck. After discussing with him the potential surgery that may be necessary for him, Dr. Ughwanogho proceeded to get to know more about the patient, and in doing so learned that he was in school training to be a pilot. Furthermore, learning the operation he had been suggesting, could potentially compromise this young man’s future career. Immediately, Dr. Ughwanogho realized these implications and quickly adapted his plan to accommodate an outcome that is more in favor of this young man’s future profession. Dr. Ughwanogho’s display of compassion and patient-focused care makes him a very strong role model that any surgeon-hopeful can, and should, look up to.

                After a long day, we arrived back home and turned on the television to watch some Olympics, but were quickly distracted by the CNN headlines of the Ebola outbreak in Uganda. After a few seconds of watching we were even more surprised to see a screen shot of the Mulago hospital, the hospital we had just operated at all last week, and all day today. Although we had been aware that Ebola was present in the Kibaale district, we were not informed of its presence at Mulago until now. This made most of us quite uneasy, and in no time family members were sending emails and texts sharing their concerns for our safety. We were later told that Mulago had not yet confirmed cases of Ebola, but there were several health care professionals being quarantined. We were more reassured when we heard that the airports were still open, there had been no travel restrictions placed on Uganda, and the belief from health officials that if there was any suspicious virus, it had been contained at Mulago.

                In an attempt to take our minds off of our worry about the current situation, we went for an absolutely incredible dinner at the Kampala Serena Hotel. This buffet dinner had the most delicious fresh avocado  smoked tilapia, beef kebabs, and a smorgasbord of desserts. After filling ourselves to the brim, we headed home. Before going to bed, much to the delight of our Polish anesthesiologists, we watched the Poland Men’s Beach Volleyball team (or as Jason astutely puts it, “sand” volleyball since they are not playing on a beach during this Olympics) defeat the USA team.  We then retired to bed, some us quite nervous as to what tomorrow would hold with respect to going to Mulago to operate, and furthermore, the implications of our travelling home with this health threat brewing.

Uganda Mission Day 8

November 5, 2012

Uganda Mission

We finally have the final blog posts from Dr. Lieberman’s Uganda trip!

Day 8 – Seeing More of Kampala

Contributed by Erin Sadler

The day started with some of the team heading off to round on post-operative patients at the respective hospitals. The others who remained at the apartments spent the morning doing laundry, finishing up some work, catching up on other odds and ends, plugged into the Olympics, and in Dr. Holman’s case: fighting a suspected case of food poisoning. In the early hours of the morning, it came to Ngozi’s and my attention that Dr. Holman was feeling under the weather. By the time the morning arrived he was feeling worse and we were all concerned that he had eaten something bad that was taking a toll on his system. It was no surprise that Liz took on the nurturing role of nurse to keep a close eye on him.

Once everyone had returned from rounding, we decided to spend the afternoon going to the art market and gain a more inside look at Kampala by visiting the city market. We had initially thought we would visit the Bujagali Falls, but the previous day, during our return from Putti, we had sat in traffic for over an hour, and thus we were hesitant to take this same route, and spend the afternoon baking in a vehicle stuck in bumper to bumper traffic. Instead, we settled on the local markets. After getting a grocery list from Liz with remedies for Dr. Holman, including salted crackers, ginger ale, and Lucozade, we headed off in the bus to exercise our bargaining skills at the market.

The art market is an area in the center of town where various vendors have set up booths and sell their goods. There is everything from jewelry to art, to authentic Ugandan clothing, pottery, and other trinkets. Going from booth to booth we began to appreciate not only the art of the vendors, but the art of bargaining the price down. This was best demonstrated when we were looking at the section of the market with paintings. It was quite entertaining to see Brian attempt to exercise his negotiating prowess to try and get a painting from 150000 shillings to 80000. Although he claims he “won” since he did not end up paying more than he wanted, he also walked away empty-handed because the artist wouldn’t budge below 90000. Others were more successful, and came away with treasures that they had negotiated to a reasonable price.

From the art market, we courageously ventured to the real Kampala city market where goods are bought, sold, and traded. This was an absolutely incredible experience, to gain an insider’s look at the local commerce of Uganda. We also gained important knowledge regarding appropriate attire to wear in Ugandan public: women should not wear shorts. Unbeknownst to me, wearing shorts is the closest thing to being naked, as in Ugandan culture, a women’s thighs should only be exposed to her husband. I guess I had to learn this lesson the hard way, as many of the locals were taking pictures and quite interested in the “Muzungu” who was “naked.” Needless to say, the group of us was quite a spectacle to see wandering through the maze of alley-ways filled with mountains of clothing, shoes, electronics, and various food products and other provisions. This visit did serve a greater purpose; upon seeing the glorious local produce, we were inspired to buy ingredients to make guacamole. Under the keen eye of Chef Brian, we selected and bought the finest avocados, garlic, onions, hot peppers and limes. After making our way safely back to the vans, with our purchases in tow, and the new knowledge of what not to wear, we headed home. After a quick stop at the Nakumatt (the 24 hour grocery store) to buy a few more key ingredients including cilantro, salt and chips, we arrived home, all of us anticipating Brian’s creation. I have to admit I was skeptical, but Brian proved to be quite the chef, and concocted some of the most delicious guacamole I have ever tasted.

After our delicious appetizer, we decided to have our second dinner at Khyper Pass, the delicious Indian restaurant we had gone to on the first evening. Unfortunately, Dr. Holman was still feeling sick, and after giving him a few litres of intravenous saline and reminding him what it is like to be on the patient side of health care, he was still not up for taking solid food, so we headed off without him, promising white rice upon our return.

With our bellies full and white rice for Dr. Holman, we returned home to play a lively game of “Things.” Hopefully you have played this game, because in my opinion it might be the most fun game ever created. Needless to say, the rest of the evening was filled with hysterical laughter, learning a lot about each other, perhaps even things we may not have wanted to know, and most importantly, the complexities of Brian’s relationship with his cat, Max.

Congratulations to Dr. Hochschuler and Dr. Lieberman!

Becker’s Spine Review recently released the “61 Spine Surgeon Inventors to Know,” which includes Dr. Stephen Hochschuler and Dr. Isador Lieberman of Texas Back Institute.  Members of the list were selected for their research and innovation contributing to the development of spine surgical devices and techniques.

The list was created as a result of extensive research. Surgeons included on the list were trained at top medical schools and have worked with some of the biggest device companies to bring their ideas to the market. In many cases, their contributions have made a difference in the quality and cost-effectiveness of spinal procedures. Many of them are also leaders within their practices, hospital departments or professional organizations.

Here is what was written on the Becker’s website.

Stephen Hochschuler, MD (Texas Back Institute, Plano). Dr. Hochschuler is the co-founder of Texas Back Institute and chairman of Texas Back Institute Holdings. He has several patents for spinal stabilization devices and co-founder of Innovative Spinal Technologies. During his career, Dr. Hochschuler has served on the scientific advisory board of physicians for Alphatec Spine and business advisory board for DePuy Spine. He was co-founder of the Spine Arthroplasty Society, now known as the International Society for the Advancement of Spine Surgery, and has participated in several FDA trials. Dr. Hochschuler earned his medical degree at Harvard Medical School in Boston and completed his residency in orthopedic surgery at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas.

Isador Lieberman, MD (Texas Back Institute, Plano). Dr. Lieberman holds multiple patents for his technological innovations, including SpineAssist, a robotic tool he recently co-developed for use during minimally invasive spine surgery. He has held appointments with Cleveland Clinic as staff surgeon and professor of surgery at Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine. His developments have been recognized with awards from Cleveland Clinic and the Spine Society of Europe. He recently co-founded the Uganda Charitable Spine Surgeon Mission, with which he accompanies a team of surgeons to visit Uganda each year to treat the underprivileged with spine conditions. He earned his medical degree from the University of Toronto in Ontario, Canada, and completed his residency at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto. He also completed residency programs in orthopedic surgery at two Toronto hospitals along with a clinical fellowship in spine and trauma surgery at The Toronto Hospital.

Physicians do not pay and cannot pay to be selected for this list.

*Becker’s Spine Review is a Chicago-based publication focusing on spine and pain practice management. The primary contributors and audience for the publication are spine surgeons and industry experts.

Putti Village

Contributed by Rachelle Lieberman
After our 3.5 hour drive to Mbale, Izzy, Brian, Erin and myself finally pulled up to Putti Village. Putti is a small Jewish village about 10km from Mbale.  We were warmly  welcomed by hundreds of children and adults, and they were very quick to help unload our van for us.
All of the donations after being unloaded.
After that the women of Putti had arranged a performance for us. They sung and danced beautifully in vibrant  dresses. They even made me a dress and managed to get me up to sing and  dance with them.
Next, we began to pass out all of the donations we  brought. We got sanitary pads for the women, toothbrushes for all,  shoes, t-shirts, and coloring books for the kids, and lots of medication that we left with Dr. Martin (the village’s doctor) in Mbale. They were all so grateful for all we brought them!
That night we had Shabbat services led by Rabbi Enosh in the synagogue proceeded by Shabbat  dinner. It was very interesting to see village life in Putti. It is so  simplistic. They barely have electricity, everything is cooked on an open fire, and they all share living quarters.  Erin and I slept in a room with at least 12 other people, and the same can be said for the 2 boys. There  is such a sense of community, it is very refreshing to see. It may be due to a lack of space and infrastructure, but they are happy!
Izzy, Rabbi Enosh and Sarah
Boy playing with tire in Putti.
The next  morning we once again had Shabbat services and then had to take off to head back to Kampala to rejoin the rest of the group. It took us 5 hours to get back to Kampala due to all the traffic jams, but we are used to those by now. We then joined back up with the rest of the group and had a great dinner at a casino close by.

Uganda Spine Mission

July 30, 2012

Uganda Spine Mission Day 5

By Erin Sadler

Day 5 – Finding Our Stride

Today was another day of surgery at both Mulago and Case Hospitals. The team at Mulago came up with a strategy the previous evening to try to circumvent the resistance of the Mulago staff from doing two cases in one day. We figured that we would tackle a shorter case first, so it would only be mid-morning upon completion, leaving lots of time to start a second longer case. This tactic worked, in addition to strong leadership from Liz, one of our surgical techs, and we had a very efficient and productive day with minimal setbacks or obstacles. It is very clear to see that as a team we are starting to find our stride, achieving an immense amount, with great outcomes, in a relatively short amount of time.

Across town at Case, things were a little bit more hectic. At Case, the other half of the team
were operating on a 12 year old boy with kyphoscoliosis, in addition to spina bifida occulta. After a difficult intubation, the procedure went on without complication until, much to the surprise of the team, the hospital’s oxygen supply ran out. Thanks to the prudent supervision from the anesthesia team, what could have been a potential disaster was averted, and thankfully the procedure was completed successfully. There was also a major display of “taking one for the team” from Jason, our neuromonitor. After questioning the signal he was receiving from the patient, he proceeded to hook up and shock himself to ensure the equipment was working properly. We were all very impressed and touched by his dedication to the well-being of the patient, at his own expense.

Izzy and Sister Rose

Just starting the surgery

Z our anesthesiologist


We once again all reconvened at the apartments in the early evening to share our respective experiences of the day. We then proceeded to dinner, at a ‘new’ restaurant that the previous missions hadn’t been to before. Upon arrival, the veterans on the team realized they had been here before for a wonderful reception dinner, and we were all pleasantly surprised by the ambiance and the great menu. Much like our previous evenings, we ate delicious food, drank a few glasses of wine, and shared many laughs around the table. There were several toasts made highlighting the great work of the team, especially those who have really stepped up and provided great leadership, poise in stressful situations, and selflessness in order to provide the best care possible to the patients.

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