group getting their fantasy football draftFor anyone who is an avid sports fan, this is a great time of year. The baseball pennant races are full-bore, the college football season has kicked off and the 94th season of the National Football League (NFL) begins on Thursday night, September 5, 2013. Six months later, on February 2, 2014, the NFL season will end with the crowning of a champion team of Super Bowl XLVIII.

Between now and February, a curious addiction will befall many otherwise sane men and women who enjoy following professional football. They will be consumed with the stats of players who most likely don’t even play for their favorite teams. They will spend many hours studying obscure facts such as how well a given running back performs on artificial turf versus real grass. They will struggle to juggle all-star lineups to best take advantage of a scoring system that approaches the complexity of the U.S. Tax Code.

Unlike the treatment delivered by the specialists at Texas Back Institute to patients with back pain, herniated discs or other back problems, there is really no cure for this football sickness. These lost souls are smitten by the phenomenon of playing fantasy football!

Consuming Football Facts

It may not surprise you to learn fantasy football is a very big business. It is estimated by the Fantasy Sports Trade Association that 32 million people, aged twelve and older in the U.S. and Canada, play fantasy sports. The trade group notes that fantasy football players make up 90% of the fantasy sports “industry.” This participation has grown by over 60% the last four years with 19% of males in the U.S. playing fantasy sports.

Because of this high level of participation many consumer products companies such as Sprint, Yahoo, ESPN, Fox and others have invested millions of dollars in fantasy football services and promotions. The two groups who usually disagree about almost everything associated with professional football – NFL properties (composed of the team owners) and NFL Players (the players’ union) – have both created products and services that encourage fans to play fantasy football.

The Texas Back Institute Dream Team 

Most of the fun of playing fantasy football involves choosing a “dream team” from a group of outstanding players. There are no bad football players in the NFL. They’re all good. Therefore, getting to choose the best of the best for one’s own team can be great fun.

In a similar fashion, the spine specialists at Texas Back Institute are the best in their class and as such, there are only great choices. In celebration of the hundreds of thousands of fantasy drafts in full-swing at this moment, we thought we’d introduce you to our dream team.

History of the Team:

Texas Back Institute was formed in 1977 by Stephen Hochschuler, M.D., Ralph Rashbaum, M.D. and Richard Guyer, M.D. The organization is internationally recognized for excellence for spine injuries. In football terms, this team plays offense and defense equally well and the patients are the big winners.

The Texas Back Institute Fantasy Team:

As with NFL teams, the Texas Back Institute team is composed of the best of the best of spine surgery, research and therapy. The game plan for our team has been consistent for more than 35 years. Each patient injury or condition is unique and is best treated with the most minimally invasive approach.

Here’s a brief “draft” report on each of the Texas Back Institute physicians.

arakal0Rajesh G. Arakal, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Arakal and other TBI surgeons to your team if you need thorough evaluation and treatment of cervical, thoracic and lumbar pathology.

Belanger_MD_small

Theodore Belanger, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Belanger and other TBI back experts to your team if you want a spine specialist who evaluates each patient and their situation carefully and makes treatment recommendations based on their goals.

Block_PhD_Small

Andrew R. Block, Ph.D., A.B.P.P.

Specialties: Psychologist

Add Dr. Block to your team if you need to overcome emotional difficulties of surgery, deal with stress and control medications to achieve the best surgical outcomes.

blumenthal

Scott L. Blumenthal, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Blumenthal and other TBI back specialists to your team if you believe the goal of a spine surgeon is to get his patients back to life using the most advanced motion-preserving technologies, including lumbar and cervical artificial discs as well as posterior dynamic stabilization.

bosita

Rey Bosita, M.D., M.B.A.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Bosita and other TBI physicians to your team if you want to be treated with respect and have your fears about neck and back pain removed.

bradley

W. Daniel Bradley, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Dr. Bradley along with every other TBI specialist should be on your team if you feel treatment should use the latest in motion preservation and minimally invasive surgical techniques.

cable

James D. Cable, M.D.

Specialties: Occupational & Sports Medicine

Add Dr. Cable to your team for occupational and sports medicine issues. He knows wear and tear eventually affect all of us but most back pain is manageable with proper care.

duff_small

Michael F. Duffy, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Duffy to your team if you agree that we should get busy living! His goal and that of the other spine specialists at TBI is to deliver effective spinal care to patients in order for them to return to doing what it is that makes them happy.

gibbs

Sharon J. Gibbs, M.D.

Specialties: Physiatrist

Add Dr. Gibbs to your team if being in pain affects many aspects of your life. As a physiatrist she works hard to provide patients with the best comprehensive non-surgical care.

guyer

Richard D. Guyer, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

As one of the founding physicians of Texas Back Institute, Dr. Guyer is both a player and a coach for new team members. Add him to your team if you agree with his “family test” philosophy – treating patients the way he would want his family members to be treated.

Henry_MD_web_1

Shawn M. Henry, D.O.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Dr. Henry and the other spine specialists at TBI should be on your team if you want to be treated with the most advanced technology and treatment available for your condition; holding surgery as a last resort.

hisey

Michael S. Hisey, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Hisey to your team if you feel the goal of neck and back treatment is to return patients to productive and pain-free activity using the most advanced minimally invasive and motion-preserving techniques.

hochschuler

Stephen H. Hochschuler, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Hochschuler and the other spine surgeons at Texas Back Institute to your team if you have lumbar spinal problems or have had a failed spinal procedure.

Jehan_85x85_1

Effat Jehan, M.D.

Specialties: Spine Triage Specialist

Add Dr. Jehan and the other specialists at TBI to your team if you feel the goal should be to help treat not only back and neck issues but also to provide effective coordinated support to help patients get through every day of life without any stresses related to their condition.

lankford

Craig Lankford, M.D.

Specialties: Physiatrist

If you want to be treated with respect, compassion, add Dr. Lankford and every other physician at TBI to your team. He can help you understand how pain affects your everyday life in order to help you get back to life.

lieberman

Isador Lieberman, M.D., M.B.A., FRCSC

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Lieberman and the other spine surgery experts at TBI to you team if you want to be treated as if you were the only patient we have.

marchetti

Jason Marchetti, M.D.

Specialties: Physiatrist

If you believe in ethical treatment and the importance of educating patients regarding all available treatment options, you should consider adding Dr. Marchetti and the other spine specialists at TBI to your team.

patel

Nayan R. Patel, M.D.

Specialties: Physiatrists

Add Dr. Patel to you team if you think patients should be treated in the same way a physician treats his own family.

rashbaum

Ralph F. Rashbaum, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon, Pain Management

Add Dr. Rashbaum and the other spine surgery specialists at TBI to your team if you want a timely response to back conditions which leads to predictable outcomes.

shellock

Jessica Shellock, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

Add Dr. Shellock to you team if you think it’s time to take your life back, with minimally invasive treatment. Along with the other experts on the TBI team, she is highly trained in the latest procedures.

Tolhurst_MD_web

Stephen R. Tolhurst, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeon

If you want a doctor who sees surgery as a last resort and is dedicated to returning you to the lifestyle you had before the back pain, you want Dr. Tolhurst on your team.

zigler

Jack E. Zigler, M.D.

Specialties: Orthopedic Spine Surgeons

Add Dr. Zigler and the other spine surgeons at TBI to your team if think surgery should be the last resort. However, if it’s required, he’s one of the best spine surgeons in the U.S.

Choosing Your Team

There are literally hundreds of ways to set up your league and arrange for a draft of NFL players. The best advice for those new to this pastime is to understand how the players’ performance will be scored each week. This will help determine the number of running backs, wide receivers, tight ends to choose. For example, in some leagues, the yardage gained by running backs is weighted higher than the passing yardage of quarterbacks.

One should also be aware of the “bye” weeks each team has (when they are not playing) because this will mean a player on the team with the bye, will not play that week and should not be in the lineup.  Here’s a good primer  on choosing your fantasy team.

Fortunately, choosing a spine specialist is much easier than choosing a fantasy football team! With more than 35 years of excellence in spine treatments, management of many FDA trials and a foundation of minimally invasive treatment, the dream team of physicians at Texas Back Institute is championship caliber.

DUCK-DYNASTY-facebookYou might say the executives of the A&E cable network were pleased with the premiere of the 2013 season of Duck Dynasty. Actually, it would be more accurate to say they were happy, happy, happy – to borrow a phrase from the patriarch of the Robertson clan!  As USA Today noted, “Wednesday’s episode, which focused on a surprise wedding-vow renewal ceremony for Phil and Kay Robertson, attracted 11.8 million viewers and 6.3 million advertiser-coveted young adults (18-to-49).” This was no fluke. This episode was up 37% in viewers and 26% in young adults vs. last season’s premiere, which also set records.

So, what gives here? Why would almost 12-million viewers tune in to a reality show based on the often ridiculous exploits of a group of self-avowed, redneck duck hunters?

Dr. Ralph F. Rashbaum, M.DWe asked Texas Back Institute surgeon and avid outdoor sportsman Dr. Ralph Rashbaum that question and his response is consistent with media observers around the world, “It’s simple, really. This show is about family values. All of the hunting, fishing, duck calls and related hijinks are just supporting storylines to this.”

Whether it was intentional or not, Duck Dynasty and the Southern charm of the extended Robertson family has had a positive influence on a large number of people –  both city slickers and country bumpkins – who have developed an interest in hunting and fishing. While the fishing rod, shotgun and camouflage apparel manufacturers are (dare we say it) happy, happy, happy, this will inevitably lead to more people in the fields when the fall hunting season kicks off in September.

Unfortunately, some of these hunters will show up in Dr. Rashbaum’s examining room shortly thereafter. Before getting some advice from him about avoiding back injuries while swinging that shotgun, let’s take a moment to introduce Duck Dynasty to precious few who have not made the acquaintance of the Robertson family of West Monroe, Louisiana.

Meet the Folks who Work for Duck Commander

 

The storylines of the 1950’s situation comedy “I Love Lucy” worked around a one-bedroom apartment in New York City where Lucy and Ricky Ricardo managed to get into hysterical predicaments with the help of their neighbors, Fred and Ethyl Mertz. Similarly, almost every episode of Duck Dynasty incorporates the “Duck Commander” duck call factory. Unlike Lucy and Ricky’s home, this factory actually exists and this very successful company, started by Phil Robertson, has produced highly regarded duck calls for many years.

When Phil retired to hunt ducks, fish for crappie and teach his grandbabies “how to avoid becoming yuppies,” his son Willie took over as CEO of Duck Commander. The other Robertson son, Jase, is an employee of the company and, as the most of the funny premises of the show result from Jase refusing to recognize the authority of his older brother, Willie. He is usually joined in this harassment of his brother by their Uncle Si, Phil’s brother, a Vietnam vet, perpetual ice-tea drinker and full time philosopher, and the rest of the employees at Duck Commander.

Each week, these real-life characters deal with simple issues that are cleverly embellished to become a comedic crisis. In the end, everything gets worked out and the last scene of every episode has the entire family around the dinner table with Phil saying grace.

Duck Dynasty: A Boon for Outdoor Sports

The fun these folks on Duck Dynasty are having is resonating with men and women who have decided to take up the sports of hunting and fishing. Several outdoor sports trade publications have noted that the show has done more for increasing the popularity of these ancient pursuits than anything in the past century.

It’s estimated by the National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF) that more than 20.6 million people in the U.S. hunt each year and this number will likely increase with the popularity of this show and others like it. Two years ago, the NSSF noted that more than 8,000 U.S. hunters annually were injured while enjoying their time in the woods and as more novice hunters get out in the field, this number will likely increase.

As someone who is both an avid outdoor sportsman and highly-regarded spine surgeon, Dr. Ralph Rashbaum is in a unique position to offer some guidance to both novice and seasoned hunters and anglers. “Stamina and flexibility are the two most important factors in avoiding back strains or injuries, but common sense and proper safety precautions are even more important,” he said.

Hochschuler and Rashbaum 03Dr. Rashbaum continued, “I love to bow hunt and many times this is done from a tree stand to avoid the superior sense of smell enjoyed by deer. Climbing up to the stand can cause back strains if the muscles are not properly conditioned. Falling from a tree stand can seriously injure or facture the vertebrae in the spine. This type of accident is very common and it can be avoided with proper precautions.”

Dove season begins in most states in September and many hunters will be donning the camo and swinging their 12 and 20-guage shotguns for hours. What does Dr. Rashbaum suggest for these hunters to avoid back strains and injuries?

“I’ve been on a 4-day dove hunt in South America, where my son-in-law and I shot more than 2,300 rounds of 12 and 20-gauge shells! Needless to say, we were tired at the end of the day (however, not as tired as the retrievers who brought back the birds!), but because we had conditioned our shoulders, neck and arms and had spent time stretching these muscles before the hunt, we were able to have an amazing experience and very little back pain.”

Fishing is also popular with the Duck Dynasty clan and millions of other outdoor sports enthusiasts. What does Dr. Rashbaum recommend to avoid back strain from a day of casting? “It really depends on the type of fishing you are thinking about. I love to deep-sea fish and also enjoy fly fishing in fresh water. These are two very different experiences and require different conditioning.”

“If you think you might fighting a marlin for two hours on the open sea, you should definitely get to the gym a few weeks before the trip and work on building strength in your back, shoulder and arm muscles. This can be done with weight training as well as such exercises as rowing and pull-downs. On the other hand, the most dangerous part of fly fishing is not from casting but rather from walking on slippery rocks to get near the fish. Having appropriate equipment – waders with boots that don’t slide and using a walking stick – will help with this.”

Life Lessons of Duck Dynasty

It’s interesting that the situations and values portrayed on Duck Dynasty seem to be as relevant to an urban audience as it is to that which is rural. While he lives and practices in the highly-urbanized area, Dr. Rashbaum is a big fan of the show. “The people on Duck Dynasty are the salt of the earth and represent the best of family values. Plus, they’re very funny!”

It appears that life lessons of Phil, his family and friends on Duck Dynasty go beyond frog catching and duck calling. As Uncle Si would say: “That’s a fact, Jack.”

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